My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—Those of my readers who are interested in the make-up of books as well as in their written content will want to know about a book of poems called "Glory Never Guesses," by Kenneth Patchen. These poems are actually designed to go with the drawings which were planned to accompany them. There are 18 pages, on hand-made Japanese paper of various colors and textures. I think that for anyone who likes this type of combination, this book, which must be subscribed for, will be a rewarding acquisition.

Recently I received in the mail a letter from the Welfare Federation of Cleveland, with their booklet which tries this year to describe in brief symposium form some of the "how and why of our superb record of citizenship participation in welfare work in Cleveland." They published this booklet under a grant from the Hanna Fund with the object, of course, of interesting even more of Cleveland's citizens in taking part in their welfare program. But they also hope, to quote again from the booklet, that it will be of some help "to citizen leaders and health and welfare workers in other cities who constantly ask how we have achieved this degree of cooperation and support. With the continued growth of our cities and the increasing demands for health and welfare service, as the child population grows and the numbers of older people increase, it is imperative that our community welfare organizations enlist more and more citizen interest and support."

The booklet also contains short statements from the heads of big business firms who have taken an active part in the work in Cleveland. You would expect the women's organizations to be well represented and men who are heads of various other organizations, both civic and professional, as well as government housing directors and vocational guidance people. I find in the group two people, Russell and Rowena Jelliffe, the directors of Karamu House, which has long been one of the most interesting experiments in Cleveland. This is a community center to foster interracial understanding through the cultural arts and it has succeeded because of the wide participation of the citizens of Cleveland.

If you have not been one of the fortunate to receive this booklet and are interested in improving your community, it would be wise to write the Welfare Federation of Cleveland to send you a copy, for it does contain many stimulating new ideas.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL