My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—On Friday I felt I was touching the fringes of the New York City fuel strike. I had been told to be at City Hall at 10:30 in the morning for an engagement with Mayor Robert Wagner, but just before 10:00 I got word that the Mayor had just succeeded in settling the strike and was going home to have a little rest, and would come to my house in the afternoon!

I was so glad to hear the fuel strike had been settled and that a little well-deserved rest was coming the mayor's way. Also, I was pleased at finding an hour free for myself in the morning, which I had not expected to have.

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The last few days at the office I have had interviews with three young students who were very serious in their questions and who took photographs as seriously as if they were professionals.

In one interview, with a young lady writing her thesis on the value of Americans for Democratic Action, I was interested to find her keen interest in trying to be very fair and to listen to both sides of the information she gathered on ADA.

Her father was an enthusiastic member and she was very much afraid of being influenced by his enthusiasm and of not evaluating her study objectively. She had, however, come through the study with an increased enthusiasm for the organization, which seemed to please her very much.

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Saturday morning early a little girl came to be photographed with me in connection with the Mothers' March on Polio, so photographers have been busy around my little apartment in the past few days.

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It is not too early, I think, to remind my readers that the 59th anniversary of the founding of the National Congress of Parents and Teachers will be celebrated on Founder's Day, Friday, November 17. Mrs. Rollin Brown, the national president, has announced that special programs will be held in most of the 41,000 local units across the country.

I feel that the PTA is one of the most important organizations in the country, primarily because it can wield the greatest influence on our future because of its close touch with the children of our country.

The organization was founded in Washington, D.C., on February 17, 1897, by two valiant women, Alice McLellan Birney and Phoebe Apperson Hearst, who held that "what is right and good for the favored children is right and good for all children."

This was a most advanced view for those days, and even today we have not achieved the equality of opportunity for all children which they hoped for. However, we are doing better every year, and I think this organization has helped in the progress achieved for all of our children.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL