My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK—We were only 17 for Thanksgiving dinner Thursday evening here, for two of the young people I had expected to come were not able to come and one of the older people had pneumonia. Fortunately, pneumonia is no longer the dread disease it used to be, and she is well on her way to recovery. But we had six children, which always makes a celebration at home more worthwhile.

I had seen in the paper that we would have rain all day, but one of the things we were thankful for here was a really beautiful day, and I was glad to find a number of people in church in the morning whom I have not seen for a long time. I have been traveling about so much lately that I have not been home much even for weekends except for a few in September.

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I see that in the United Nations on Thursday the Indian delegate, Mr. Krishna Menon, made the proposal that no discussion of the Algerian situation is necessary at this time, and so the General Assembly is no longer concerned with it.

This will, of course, mean the return of the French delegate immediately to the U.N., since it was the contention of France that Algeria was a part of metropolitan France and, therefore, a domestic problem outside the scope of the U.N. and could not be discussed there.

It is somewhat surprising at the moment to see the Arab delegates agreeing with the Indian proposal. But I suppose they wish to be friendly with India, and perhaps they think they have gained sufficient headway in their struggle with France for the time being.

As a matter of fact, this leaves the question of North Africa in a very problematical state. But France has the opportunity to try and negotiate with each of her colonies a more acceptable understanding and perhaps to make certain reforms which she herself finds to be needed.

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It is interesting to find Admiral Richard E. Byrd starting south on another expedition to Little America. He hopes to establish a permanent system of United States bases in the strategically important Antarctic. This is the fifth expedition that Admiral Byrd has taken.

On this particular trip his son, Lt. Richard A. Byrd, a Naval Reserve officer, is on one of the ships already on the way south. Some would think that the admiral by this time must have had enough of the rigors and hardships of these Arctic journeys, but I think he finds great fascination in going into the unknown areas of the south polar regions. He certainly knows what all the hardships can be, for he has had plenty of them, and he knows the dangers, too, physical and mental.

Men often find it hard to exist and to remain sane in the loneliness and cold of the Antarctic. No one has had more experience than Admiral Byrd in that area and he can be counted on to get the greatest value out of this expedition and to take the best care that it is possible to take of the men under his command.

The people in the United States will be watching his success with interest and all our good wishes will certainly go with him.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL