My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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CLEVELAND—We arrived here safely Wednesday afternoon. It takes 45 minutes by car from the center of the city to reach the airport at Willow Run outside of Detroit and the airport in Cleveland is nearly an hour from the center of this city by car, so in order to fly 45 minutes you drive an hour and three-quarters. But even at that it is shorter and faster than by train.

When we did arrive we had nearly an hour and a half before the press conference, which was called for 5:30 after which we had dinner. Then I found myself faced with the task of describing to the United Church women the revolutionary world in which we live today.

I am sure it is a revolutionary world, but I must say when I was asked to describe the American Legion's action on UNESCO in this context I had a feeling I would have to present the Legion's performance in Miami as the best example of those who try to resist any kind of change and cannot understand that there is need to study and explain new movements in the world.

If you want no change you have no use for an organization whose objective is to explain changes that are all about us in the world. Particularly as they are effected by the United Nations.

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I hope that many people are reading Chester Bowles' book, "The New Dimensions of Peace." I think Mr. Bowles is a most-stimulating human being always giving a fresh viewpoint on things and in this instance a different slant on the subject of peace. Although I have just begun this book, I have enjoyed every page I have read so far, and I think it will be a real contribution to the understanding of the changing world in which we live.

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I have just read a very interesting pamphlet that was prepared by Eva M. Dratz of the Western College for Women at Oxford, Ohio. Entitled "Guide to Teaching—a Teacher's Handbook About the United Nations and World Affairs," it was published by the American Association for the United Nations and the National Education Association.

The pamphlet covers teaching about the United Nations in the primary grades, the intermediate grades and the high schools. It gives the list of the organizations from which source material may be obtained, a bibliography for teachers and students and a special list of publications covering the specialized agencies, such as UNICEF, and other miscellaneous subjects.

It also contains a list of films that can be obtained through the International Film Foundation, Inc., of which Julien Bryan is the executive director.

And it tells where you can get in touch with people if you want to carry on correspondence with someone in another part of the world.

On the last page is a table showing the structure of the United Nations.

I found it a very good, brief pamphlet, and our field director Miss Ruth Morton, tells me that at the national UNESCO meeting it was one of the pamphlets that disappeared most quickly from the literature table.

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If you want an exciting novel to read I think you would enjoy the book called "The Savage City" by Jean Paradise. It is about New York in 1741. You will find it hard to recognize the city as it is today, but this is an historical story as well as a tale of ordinary people leading the ordinary lives of citizens of one city a little over two centuries ago.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL