My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa—Since the Iowa Association for the United Nations came into being two years ago it has made extensive progress. The afternoon meeting the other day in Burlington for the Mayor's Committee, which, of course, included all the organizations that wanted to support the United Nations, was a very successful one. Besides the Mayor's Committee there were a number of United Nations Association members, among them a good many new members, and they were allowed to sit in after my initial speech on the American Association for the United Nations. After a press conference interview, the audience was allowed to ask questions, but for the most part it seemed to be satisfied with what the press had done.

After a very pleasant dinner at the home of the state chairman, Mrs. Schramm, we went down to the hall for the evening meeting in time to look at some of the booths. The women had worked all summer in getting up these booths and they showed remarkable imagination.

At the booth for the Children's Emergency Fund the women actually were feeding children of different nationalities a glass of milk. And if you have seen the Danny Kaye film you know that in certain areas of the world the children, after finishing a glass of milk, ask, "May we have more UNICEF?" They think that what they are drinking and the name of the organization are synonymous.

The evening meeting was packed, some 3,000 people being there, and the state chairman and her committee who had worked on the meeting seemed very well satisfied with the results of their efforts.

After an early breakfast the following morning we drove to Cedar Rapids—a two-and-a-half-hour drive that was a joy over rolling country, with trees turning yellow and red, and neat and prosperous-looking farms.

The last part of the drive was through the countryside made familiar by Grant Wood, and one kept seeing scenes that might have walked out of one of his canvasses.

We arrived in Cedar Rapids about 11:30 and I had a press conference and a recorded radio interview. Then we went at once to a buffet luncheon delightfully arranged and with a great variety of food to choose from. This luncheon was actually a meeting of the State Committee of the Iowa United Nations Association, with the addition of local members from Mt. Vernon and Cedar Rapids.

An interesting agenda had been planned because the state chairman had explained that at the previous meetings all their time had been spent in planning organization and at this meeting they wanted to consider their stand on policies.

I began by explaining our plans for organization and our plans for consultation with our chapters on our policy. Then we discussed charter revision as it touched disarmament, collective security, and membership.

The leaders in the discussion were all able university professors, and, much to my pleasure, Professor Joseph Dunner, whom I sat next to and with whom I enjoyed talking, presented me with his new book called, "Baruch, Spinoza and Western Democracy." He feels that Spinoza has not had the recognition that is his due and should be listed among the European forefathers of our democratic faith, among such as Locke, Montesquieu and Rousseau.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL