My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—On last Thursday, October 13, I was in Bemidji, Minn., where I went via Minneapolis, to speak before the Minneapolis Education Association.

Then early Friday morning I returned to Minneapolis and my only formal engagement there was a luncheon at noon in the interests of Bonds for Israel. However, I had arranged to meet with a number of people interested in the Minnesota Association for the United Nations and in the regional association.

I had also made arrangements to see my friend, Miss Adelaide Enright at St. Paul who is always more than kind to me when I am in the Twin Cities.

The autumn coloring has reached its peak in the northern Middle West and is most beautiful. I know of no lovelier drive than the one along the Mississippi in the Twin Cities.

On Saturday the 15th I attended both a cocktail party and a dinner arranged in the Bonds for Israel campaign, then took a late plane back to New York.

In flying up to Bemidji we flew very low so I was able to see the country and I was astounded at the number of lakes. Minnesota is called the State of Ten Thousand Lakes, but I am sure there are many more, and what in many parts of the country would be called lakes are called "potholes" up there!

It is lucky for them they are not having the rains we here in the East are suffering from because I think the whole countryside would become one vast ocean—which at one time it must have been.

It is really very beautiful and marvelous fishing and hunting country, and around the borders of the lakes there are many places for summer vacationers.

Bemidji itself is called the icebox of the U.S. and frequently in winter they have temperatures of 40 degrees below zero. The evening I was there it turned chilly and I could feel what a frosty breath could come to that area.

An outstanding site is a statue of a large blue bull and an enormous man standing by the lake. The man was called Paul Bunyan and is tied up with the legend of the forest giant who came to the area.

The State Teachers College in Bemidji is run by a very enterprising and efficient president, Dr. Charles R. Sattgast. He and Mrs. Sattgast were more than kind in their welcome to me. Mrs. Sattgast was my hostess all the time I was there and a very thoughtful and sweet one. They even saw me off at the early hour of 7 o'clock in the morning and Dr. Sattgast came with me to Minneapolis where he was presenting his request for another building for his college.

I enjoyed my time there and was happy to find that I could stay overnight with my friend, Miss Enright, in St. Paul.

All my hosts were very hospitable and I attended several delightful informal gatherings. One of the most interesting things was to see a collection of articles, books, and pictures that pertained to my husband. This remarkable collection was put together by a charming young girl and is historically very interesting.

I reached home safely Sunday morning and was at once confronted with the results of the storm and the rain that still was with us.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL