My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—Just as I expected, Thursday turned out to be a very busy day! I worked at my desk from the moment I arrived at my apartment at 6:30 a.m. until I went to speak to a group of home-demonstration agents from North Carolina whom Dr. Frank Graham had persuaded to stay over to meet with Mr. Clark Eichelberger and myself just before noon.

I did stop long enough for breakfast and a bath and a chat with my son, John, but in spite of all my industry it seemed to me that there was still a good deal of unfinished business on my desk when I left in the pouring rain for my office at 11:30.

Dr. Graham, who is one of North Carolina's most illustrious citizens, always looks after the ladies from the farm areas when they come up from Washington, and he was on hand to greet us. We spent a very pleasant hour with this interesting group of women who had been visiting the United Nations for two whole days.

I dashed over to the U.N. Building for a very pleasant but rather hurried lunch with Doris Fleeson, the columnist, who was here from Washington.

After lunch we went into our long, annual board meeting, which began its session soon after two o'clock and did not adjourn until after 10:30 in the evening.

The board was brought up to date fully on all the business usually carried on by the Executive Committee between board meetings, and I was gratified that we had a fairly large attendance.

Dr. Charles Mayo, who has been our president for nearly two years, said we should be thinking of electing a new president, which makes us all rather sad. Dr. Mayo is a delightful person and one with whom it is a joy to work. But I realize it is hard to carry more than one full-time job, and, of course, he has a full-time job in Rochester, Minn., as well as many part-time jobs!

Dr. Mayo assured us, however, that when we did find a new president he would still continue his interest in the U.N. and in our AAUN and make some speeches for us from time to time.

Mr. Douglas Fairbanks, who is one of our vice-presidents but who is away so much that we rarely have the pleasure of seeing him, came for dinner and the evening meeting. So, it was a surprise and a delight to see him. I had not realized that he and his wife were in New York and I was very happy to see him and I hope I can see both of them while they are here.

On Friday I spoke at P.S. 71 in the morning. The schools of New York City are inaugurating a campaign to encourage their students to read. As I think this is one of the really important parts of education I was very glad to be able to take part in setting off this campaign.

It was a special pleasure to have Mrs. Henry Grady of San Francisco in my home for luncheon with a few other ladies on Friday. Then in the early afternoon I attended a finance meeting for the AAUN and later had a meeting with Commissioner Richard Patterson. After that session I left for Cold Spring where I spoke at the Cold Spring Institute on my way to Hyde Park.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL