My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—Of late we have been reading a number of articles by ex-Senator Harry Cain on the injustices in our security program. These point up the difficulty of preserving the rights of individuals while at the same time preserving the security of our country. There is one case I have watched with interest—that of Corienne Morrow who decided to fight for reinstatement in her position with the Housing and Home Finance Division of the National Housing Authority. She had been serving as Dr. Frank S. Horne's assistant. Dr. Horne lost his job in 1952 when it was placed in Schedule C and filled by political appointment, and Mrs. Morrow's position in the agency has been ruled not interchangeable with any other position. This, of course, is a device to circumvent Civil Service safeguards which might otherwise protect her.

Dr. Horne's case is being publicly fought. Mrs. Morrow's is just mentioned in passing now and then but it is of special interest to women because she worked her way up from a very low income bracket to an administrative position and she has been a symbol to many of her people both of the success and opportunity which Negro women might have in government service. She has almost 21 years of career service behind her and she is the senior in period service of all racial relations functionaries in the Housing and Home Finance Agency. Her annual salary was $10,065 when she was released. This makes her case important to a very great number of women, and I think it should be brought to the attention of the public and very carefully followed.

On Wednesday morning I had to go to Worth Street and pass a test because I said I was deaf in my right ear when I renewed my driver's license. The test was quickly passed and my license renewed. But I decided that if I was going to be uptown in time to do a recording with Martha Deane I would have to take the subway. I discovered once I got into the Canal Street station that there are drawbacks to being photographed often for people look at you, think you are familiar, and then stare steadily trying to make out if they really know you or not! Finally someone says: "She looks like Mrs. Roosevelt," then they begin to ask if you are Mrs. Roosevelt. Just as this was happening the express came along and I got on but the process of recognition that began on the platform continued in the subway. One very sweet lady reminded me of all the times she had seen me before and several people asked me for autographs but I had to explain that I never did autographing in public places. When I got off at my stop I had to do what I always do—walk as fast as possible so that no one will have time for that second look which brings recognition.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL