My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK—I have been back several days now, and it certainly is remarkable how busy one can get in the first few days after one returns home although everything has gone along perfectly well when one was away and did nothing!

One of my young nieces sent me a prayer the other day which I think all of us sometimes would like to say. Here it is:

"I pray for:
Wisdom with which to choose a way and strength to lead along it.
Courage to change when change is good and faith for the shady places."

That seems to me to cover a great many of the things that many of us would like to ask.

During the week I saw a number of interesting things. First I went to see an exhibition of Reginald Marsh's paintings at the Whitney Museum of Art. As usual, we wait until an artist is dead before we give him full recognition. Marsh died last year, and so this exhibit is in the nature of a memorial. I was glad to have a chance to see his wife and congratulate her on the really fine collection and the appreciation that it will undoubtedly evoke. The exhibition will be at the Whitney Museum for some time.

Then I had an opportunity to see an interesting new Japanese film at the Museum of Modern Art called "Yang Kwei Fei," and to meet the young Japanese woman, Miss Machiko Kyo, who stars in it. She is charming and very pretty and does her part extremely well. Those who know Japan will enjoy this film, I am sure. It deals with Chinese past history but the theme is pertinent to any time, for it deals with the people's desire for clean government and their desire to feel that the government is conducted in their interest and not in the interest of a few people.

When the people rise, the innocent as well as the guilty suffer; and that certainly happens today as well as in the past.

I also had the pleasure of seeing the U.N. General Assembly open, of hearing Secretary Dulles and Mr. Molotov's speeches in the general debate that precedes getting down to real work, and I have seen a great many people and talked about a great many things since our plane landed last Sunday afternoon.

The nice part, of course, is seeing one's family and friends and having a chance to pick up the threads which one could not maintain while one was gone.

The hurricane did considerable damage to our houses at Hyde Park. Our cellars were flooded, and since the machinery that runs the pumps, deep freezers and other equipment is in the cellar, this meant that new motors had to be put in and a good many things—such as food and other items stored in the cellar—were ruined. Both my youngest son and I were away, but those who were at Hyde Park went through some very difficult days and from their description I can imagine what the troubles of people have been who were very much more affected than we were.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL