My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK—I was very sorry to hear last Saturday morning of the death of Mr. Cordell Hull. He had been so alone since the death of Mrs. Hull that perhaps for him it is a blessed release.

He served his country many years with ability and integrity, and he was a valued public servant. He worked with my husband as Secretary of State, and I know my husband thought very highly of him and of the work which he accomplished. Because of his long service in the Congress he understood particularly well how to create a workable relationship between the Department of State and the legislative branch of our government.

No one who knew Mr. Hull could fail to respect and admire him and grieve at his passing.

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The Curtis Publishing Company has just sent me a new magazine, called "Bride-To-Be." I suppose the bride-to-be may prove a very good market, though I confess that it would seem that this is a rather competitive field. There are a number of very good magazines appealing to women from the age of 17 to the grandmother period.

This is, however, a fine publication and we live in an age of specialization, so it may well be that the brides of the future will enjoy their own magazine.

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I have just read a very optimistic little book by Charles Z. Smith entitled "Peace Is Here—Here To Stay." He feels that we are really reaching the point where men are prepared to recognize that peace is essential for survival and that in the United Nations we have the instrument through which to work.

Being a logical person, Mr. Smith feels that men will accept this and will develop the U.N. and eventually create a peaceful world. Being a religious man, he ends his book with the sentence: "God is guiding all the nations unerringly into a just, righteous, and everlasting peace. We thank Thee, God."

I certainly feel that we are getting much divine inspiration all over the world, and I hope that men everywhere will accept it and achieve the really peaceful world that would bring blessings to mankind.

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I have just been reading a book published by the Memphis State College Press which contains four lectures given by Claude G. Bowers at the Memphis State College.

The first lecture on government, which describes the battle to make democracy a reality, is about a vital period of our history and one which perhaps many of us should read again at the present time. It renews one's courage and determination to see to it that the forces of democracy triumph over the forces of reaction. We certainly are better able to do this today than were the people of Jefferson's day.

The lecture on James K. Polk and the two on Andrew Jackson are very valuable to a Democrat, particularly to a Democrat who believes that there is value in building a party and trying to make the party stand for definite principles.

Andrew Jackson really built the Democratic party, and there should be inspiration to fight for that party in this story. One must never forget, however, that we must also fight within the party to make it retain its original concepts.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL