My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—The British election results were not a very great surprise, but the margin should give Sir Anthony Eden an opportunity to carry through his policies and to feel that he has the country's backing.

It was interesting that in this election so many women were elected, more than at any time apparently since a record was made in 1945. Fourteen women will represent the Labor party in the House of Commons and 10 will sit for the Conservatives. I recognize some of the names I have known for a long time.

It was also confirmed that Harold Macmillan, British Foreign Secretary, will go to San Francisco to attend the ceremonies marking the 10th anniversary of the United Nations and this means that there could be, and probably will be, a meeting of the Big Four foreign ministers during the U.N. celebrations.

One hopes that all these ministers will take time off to stay during the whole six days, though many of them may feel they cannot do so. The actual day of signing the Charter should be the important day—and that is June 26.

I have been hoping that President Eisenhower either would open the meeting in San Francisco or be there to commemorate the actual signing on the 26th and that he might invite President Truman also on the closing day to speak since he was the President who actually signed the charter. It would be such a good example to the world of our unity in foreign policy.

It came out so clearly in the hearings on Charter revision that former Presidents Truman and Hoover could find common meeting ground in supporting the Charter, and it would be good to have this demonstrated again on this commemorative occasion.

I went to a preview Friday night of a movie made in Israel. It is called "Hill 26 Doesn't Answer." I do not think it will be exhibited commercially until the autumn. It is a very moving story, and the more one sees of the results of war the more one hopes that people will find ways of settling their difficulties without recourse to war.

Those of us here in New York who enjoyed seeing the exhibition of Steichen photographs at the Museum of Modern Art received with much interest and pleasure news that there is now a book, which is selling on the newsstands and in bookstores, called "The Family of Man," and which has good reproductions of the exhibition photographs. Many people have said that the Steichen photographic collection carries the message of the brotherhood of man far better than any words could do, which is a sound reason for publishing the book.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL