My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—I got back from my trip to Boulder, Colo., in the very early hours of Thursday morning after a most interesting and invigorating few days.

Every year the University of Colorado puts on a week featuring excellent speakers and discussion panels covering all possible phases of foreign affairs and particularly featuring the United Nations.

I opened the convocation on Monday morning with a speech on the successes and failures of the U.N. That afternoon, over a two-hour period, we had a panel discussion on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, its history and its effects.

On Tuesday morning there was another panel covering the Near East and my impressions of three years ago as well as my latest visit to Israel.

This project at Colorado University has a most stimulating atmosphere and I am sure there are few places where young college students get more interesting speakers and concentrated thought on foreign relations generally.

I went to Boulder because my granddaughter, Chandler, asked me to go, and I was happy to have this opportunity to see my son, Elliott, and his wife. But I also am glad I went because of the appreciation I gained of the type of professors this school can offer its young people and of the kind of stimulation the students get to think for themselves. This, after all, is a basic part of education.

I arrived home to find an invitation to attend a dinner of the America-Israel Society in Washington on April 26. I imagine Governor Theodore R. McKeldin will again preside, and I also understand there will be a number of speakers from the House and Senate.

So, I will journey back and forth to Washington several times in the near future. I was there on the 16th for the dinner in honor of Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn and I will be there on the 22nd for an hour or two to testify before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on U.N. Charter revision.

This is the tenth year of the U.N. and the General Assembly must decide whether to call a conference to consider revision of the Charter. So the Senate committee has been holding meetings all over the country to ascertain the feeling of the people as well as of experts on this very important subject.

Fortunately, the dinner of the America-Israel Society on the 26th coincides with a board meeting at Howard University, so I will be able to schedule more than one activity on that day!

I received word today that in a column I wrote some time ago on housing in Israel I gave the impression that the labor organization known as Histadruth had only done "some" housing. I have been asked to correct my statement because it is felt that Histadruth should get credit for a really remarkable amount of housing that has been built, and I thoroughly agree.

In this regard I am glad to give some figures.

Histadruth, up to now, has built 40,000 homes, housing some 160,000 people. Thirty-four thousand were built in the past seven years, or since the creation of the State of Israel. These building activities include the erection of 10 workers' garden cities, some of them with a population of 10,000 to 20,000.

And I might add that the 40,000 homes built by the workers' housing company do not include tens of thousands of houses built by the Labor Federation in agricultural, cooperative and collective settlements.

That is really rather an impressive record of housing for one group!

E.R.

(Distributed by United Feature Syndicate, Inc.)

TMs, AERP, FDRL