My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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BOULDER, Colo.—On last Saturday morning I did a recording with Mr. Roy Wilkins, who is the new director for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. It will be the first of a series of 13 memorial broadcasts on the work to which Walter White gave his life.

Some years ago I opened the first of a series of Walter White's broadcasts with him, so I was glad of the opportunity to speak on this first broadcast with Mr. Wilkins and voice my admiration for Mr. White and my sorrow at the loss which has come to us all in his death.

Mr. White did so much to remove racial discrimination, and he had great courage in his work. I hope that the organization he built up will continue to be a great force in the country to bring freedom and justice to every individual citizen.

I took the 1:30 plane to Washington Saturday afternoon and was met by my son, James. Then I met briefly with some of his colleagues before attending a dinner given by the National Democratic Committee in the evening for the Hon. Sam Rayburn.

Mr. Rayburn has served in Congress for a long time. He has been the Speaker of the House for a long time and that is an important post with great power. He has used his power on the whole wisely and well. He has made friends and I am sure that every President with whom he has worked has had respect for him and admiration.

I know my husband had much respect for him and counted on him to achieve many of the results which could not have been achieved without his cooperation in Congress. Mr. Truman felt the same way but he was there in person Saturday night to voice his own feelings.

A testimonial dinner is usually a warm occasion, when everyone is saying kind things about everyone else, but at this affair for Sam Rayburn I hope there were said some things of real value to party politics, both in public and in private.

It has seemed to me that there has not been a close enough association between the Congressional Democratic leaders, the National Committee, and Mr. Adlai Stevenson, the titular head of our party.

I was shocked when I read the piece in the paper by Mr. James Reston of The New York Times, which stated there had been no consultation on program or policies between Mr. Stevenson and the Congressional leaders. It seems to me that we need contact to build a strong party in preparation for 1956.

If we believe that our party can best serve the interest of the country, and since we have a majority in Congress now, then we should be showing our ability to frame policies wherein we think we can do better than the party in power at present. This can only be done if we have close cooperation and consultation.

E.R.

(Distributed by United Feature Syndicate, Inc.)

TMs, AERP, FDRL