My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK—As I look back on last weekend, beginning with Thursday morning, I am somewhat appalled at the pace I set for the four-day period.

We landed at Idlewild Airport on our flight from Paris ahead of time on Thursday morning and got away from the airport soon after six a.m. We dropped Mr. Abba Schwartz, who had crossed with us, at LaGuardia Field, took Miss Maureen Corr home, and I reached my own apartment at seven o'clock. For the rest of the day I felt as though I had been up for at least two days!

I lunched with Mr. John Golden at Sardi's and had a glimpse of Leonard Lyons who was just starting off for Egypt. He said his column needed a change of pace, and it will certainly get it by his spending Easter in Egypt.

I went to my office at the American Association for the United Nations in the afternoon and found that there were many things to talk over. But I had left my datebook at home, so we were not able to do a great deal about settling future dates. I was conscious of the mountain of mail on my desk but came home early enough to have tea with Joe Lash and his son, Jonathan. I told them what I could about Trude whom we had seen off in Paris for Morocco and who will not be home until the end of this week.

On Friday I dashed down somewhat late to the office to speak to a conference of students called by the WFUNA (World Federation of United Nations Association). These are graduate students studying in this country and interested in the U.N. Then I spent the rest of the morning in my office at the AAUN catching up on all that had happened since I left early in March. I brought a great amount of work home to read and I shall go through it on the trips I go on in the near future.

I came back home and lunched with a friend, worked all afternoon at my desk and then went out to dine with Miss Esther Lape.

Saturday morning early a young lady who had been trying to see me for some time appeared and as soon as she left I was called for to go out to Queens College for their annual U.N. conference. This is held by the community in conjunction with the college and their topic was "The U.N. Today and Tomorrow."

Two very able people spoke with me, Mr. Thomas Bent, a young attorney, and Miss Alma John, a radio commentator for the Homemakers Club on WWAL. The conference extended over a full afternoon session, but we left soon after we had started it off.

I was glad to have the chance to meet the two young students who called for me. Both are studying to be teachers, one at Columbia getting her Masters and the other at Queens. They are full of enthusiasm and charm, and our driver remarked that he wished he had had such charming teachers when he was in school.

I was home in time to do a short recording for a Dutch program asked for by the Voice of America. The rest of my day was rather calm and quiet but spent in preparation for an early start to Pittsburgh Sunday morning from where I returned in time for dinner.

E.R.

(Distributed by United Feature Syndicate, Inc.)

TMs, AERP, FDRL