My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—I was shocked on reaching Paris, en route home from Israel, to hear the news of Walter White's death.

Walter White was a very valuable citizen of our country. He served us all well. Though he was a man of great courage, moral and physical, he never allowed himself to lose sight of his objective and act from anger rather than from reason. He helped the cause of his race and he helped his country by being persistent but calm and in many cases objective when others could not have been so far-sighted because of their feelings.

I always liked to talk things over with Walter White. He could often clarify situations and help me to see things more objectively. I also enjoyed working with him. I shall miss him personally and the work to which he gave his life will feel his loss.

One always hopes, though, that a man of Walter White's caliber will leave behind him a legacy to others who, because he has gone, will work all the harder to achieve the results he was interested in. Of him one can only say: he fought the good fight and had a right to the rest which he now enjoys.

I also want to pay my deep and warm respects to a man my husband long admired, John W. Davis. They did not always see eye to eye, but I know my husband always held him in high esteem. Mr. Davis was not only a great lawyer but he was a great public servant who loved his country and who always stood for the things he believed were in the interest of his country.

I managed to read three books while I was abroad. The first was a novel called "Some Love, Some Hunger" by Millen Brand. This is a curious tale of little things but it brings certain phases, unpleasant phases, of life very close and makes them very vivid. It is not a book to enjoy but it is a book to read, particularly in this day when so many of us need to understand children.

The question of delinquents is propounded in the book, and the answer is that delinquency cannot be explained by any one thing. It is to be understood only when we are familiar with environments and all that is ugly as well as all that love can make good even in the ugliest surroundings.

I also read a short book published in England, which is "The Story of Degania" as told by Joseph Baratz. This should be read by anyone who wants to understand what the Israel kibbutz is, how they came into being and what the people were like who founded them.

Finally I was given in London "Knight Errant," a biography of Douglas Fairbanks Jr. by Brian Connell. This is an English publication and is well done. I think it will be an addition to all the history that is gradually being built up on the years of war, though, of course, Douglas Fairbanks' own story is a delightful and engrossing story as well.

E.R.

(Distributed by United Feature Syndicate, Inc.)

TMs, AERP, FDRL