My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

MARSEILLES, France—It was a pleasure in London to have an opportunity to talk with Mr. Chester Bowles and his wife about their trip to Africa, India and Burma.

As I told you, on the night of my arrival in London I heard him make a formal talk at the English Speaking Union. But on Friday we dined with Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Fairbanks Jr., and after dinner I had an opportunity to talk at some length with the Bowleses. Mrs. Fairbanks was also kind enough to have the High Commissioner for India, Madame Pandit, and the Dowager Marchioness of Reading there, both of whom I was anxious to see before leaving.

I think Madame Pandit rather dreaded this new assignment, but she is such a favorite and everyone so much enjoys having her in London that I feel she has already made her place. Besides, London is a familiar and homelike place to her.

I hated to say goodbye to the Dowager Marchioness of Reading, who is always so kind and thoughtful. I am so fond of her that I really grieve that she is so busy and I am so busy that even when we are together either in England or the United States it is difficult to find enough time to see much of each other.

I was very glad, also, to have a chance to talk at dinner with Mr. Anthony Nutting. While he was at the United Nations as head of the United Kingdom delegation I had met him, but I had never had an opportunity to talk with him. His wife is young and very pretty, and I am glad that she promises to come with him when he returns to the U.S. in the autumn and I again shall have an opportunity of seeing them both.

Mr. Nutting also is very young but very able, having already performed some very important work in the diplomatic field, including negotiating the final phases of the British-Egyptian agreement on the Suez Canal Zone.

Mr. Nutting seems to have that uncanny knack of not underestimating his opponent and for that reason he is able to judge what his capacities are. So I was not surprised to find that he spoke with a real understanding of his recent Egyptian opponent, Lt. Col. Gamal Abdel Nasser. I feel that Mr. Nutting is going to be very popular in the U.S. because of his youth and his reputation for brilliance.

We were sorry to leave our little apartment at Claridge's. It had become quite homelike. But our trip to Paris was easy and comfortable on Saturday morning, and the drive in from the airport brought us quickly back to the familiar Paris scenes and atmosphere.

Paris is always a beautiful city and, as one drives down from the Madeleine to the Place de la Concorde and the familiar Crillon door, one cannot help getting a feeling of warmth and anticipation of enjoyment, for Paris is a friendly city. I have always loved France and the French people, and the atmosphere is so different from London that you find yourself enjoying both cities in quite different ways. Our stay in Paris was brief indeed, but we are coming back in a very short time.

E.R.

(Distributed by United Feature Syndicate, Inc.)

TMs, AERP, FDRL