My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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LONDON—Snow flurries are nothing astonishing at home but to find them constantly swirling around you here in London is a great surprise.

Mr. Muggeridge of Punch, who has a TV program, appeared at my hotel at nine a.m. on Wednesday morning and we had a little talk before going over to do the kinescope for his program which is on Wednesday evenings. He is a delightful interviewer and a charming person, and I enjoyed our time together. He seemed to be as surprised by London's weather as I was.

In spite of the weather, however, I walked up to Grosvenor Square on Tuesday morning with Mrs. Trude Lash and showed her the statue of my husband. We found all of the flower bulbs sprouting, and some of the daffodil plants are quite tall. They certainly looked as if they might soon be in bloom.

At noon on Wednesday I took the train with Mr. George Spencer to go to Nottingham, from which scholarship students have been sent to the United States every year since 1946. I shall tell you in another column about the reunion there.

Before leaving New York I received a note asking me to tell my readers about the Hannah Harrison School, which was established four years ago in Washington, D.C. At the time of his death Julius Garfinckel endowed this school and left it to be administered on a scholarship basis by the YWCA of the District of Columbia.

Vocational fellowships are offered that give employment training and room and board to women between the ages of 20 and 55. Also, individualized training is offered in four fields: institutional housekeeping, clothing instruction and alterations, commercial foods, and business administration.

The training period varies according to the individual's ability and interest, but five months is the usual length of a semester. New students are admitted in September and February of each year.

Every effort is made to find suitable positions for students upon completion of their training. And any woman may apply. There are no specific educational or other requirements, but the qualifications considered in awarding the fellowships are: integrity, good health, capacity for learning in the field of vocational interest, and financial need.

This is really a wonderful opportunity open to women who find themselves obliged to earn a living and who have never had the proper training, or who need retraining.

I was asked to tell you about this school because it offers a much-needed opportunity and is open to women all over the U.S. and even from other countries. Women of any nationality may apply and there are no bars as to race, religion or color.

E.R.

(Distributed by United Feature Syndicate, Inc.)

TMs, AERP, FDRL