My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa—When we arrived in Madison, Wisconsin, late last Sunday night, we were presented with a very kind note from Mrs. William G. Rice whose husband is a professor at the University of Wisconsin and the son of our old friends, the William G. Rices in Albany, who were so kind to us when we first went there and my husband was a young member of the New York State Senate.

Mrs. Rice knew that the Wisconsin Union, where we were to stay, which incidentally has delightful guest rooms, did not serve Sunday breakfast, so she kindly invited us to breakfast with her and her husband, and it was a great pleasure.

Both Sunday and Monday in Madison were clear but very cold.

I did a special recording Sunday morning for a lady and answered some questions for a young lady who had written her thesis on my husband. Later we had lunch with a group of the student members of the Union Forum Committee. These young people who run the forum arrange for speakers from the outside for their major meetings and schedule local professors to talk at a number of smaller meetings. They are delightful hosts and I always have enjoyed the chance to be with them.

From 2:30 to 3:30 Sunday afternoon there was a press conference and then three radio recorded interviews, after which I slipped out for half an hour to go with Mr. and Mrs. Jim Doyle to a Democratic state committee meeting. I was assured there would be no press representatives and I could just informally meet the leaders of this very vital and actively growing Democratic organization.

The Wisconsin Democrats increased their Congressional representation in the last campaign and they are holding monthly state meetings in the hope of building an even better organization to support their next campaign.

At 6 o'clock my secretary, Miss Maureen Corr, and I had dinner with the members of the Forum Committee. I spoke at 8 o'clock to an audience of about 1,500 people which filled the theatre at the Wisconsin Union. There was the usual question period following my talk and then we adjourned to a smaller room where the students came and spent almost another hour asking questions. By 11 o'clock the evening was over.

Monday morning one of our hosts, still feeling responsible for us, took us to breakfast in the cafeteria. But classes had begun and other members had to return to work and forget about guests.

We had lunch in another of the four dining rooms kept running in the Union and were called for at 2 o'clock to be driven the 41 miles to Janesville, where I spoke Monday night before the Janesville History Club.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL