My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—Wednesday night I attended here the Roosevelt Day dinner of the Americans for Democratic Action. Like most dinners of this kind it seemed to me to have more speeches than were necessary and I was pleased that my son, Franklin, Jr., did not speak at great length. He made one point that struck me especially, namely, that while we can learn with profit from the past, the things that lie before us are new and may require new answers.

Senator Lehman made his usual thoughtful address, and I also enjoyed the speech of Senator Richard Neuberger of Oregon which dealt with conservation. In my opinion, no one knows this subject better than he does, and he made clear to all of us at the dinner what has been happening recently in this field.

Instead of conserving our natural resources we are losing them rapidly. Many of the people at the dinner knew nothing about conservation and it was helpful to hear someone who could give some facts. But I think it took the Senator a little too long to get into the main part of his speech.

Senator O'Mahoney of Wyoming spoke on the matter of business monopolies. Many others took part in what was, on the whole, an interesting evening.

On Thursday evening I attended the Bentley School founder's day exercises in the auditorium of the YM and YWHA. Dr. Margaret Mead, Mr. Norman Cousins and Professor William Kilpatrick of Columbia University made a great contribution to the subject of "Education for an Atomic Age."

Early Friday morning I went to the School of Industrial Art in Manhattan and spoke at two assemblies.

I saw some of the work of the students and was much impressed by their accomplishments. One of the senior albums was shown me, and in drawing, painting and design as well as in ceramics, I must say that the work seemed to me to be on a very high level.

The head of the school, Mr. John B. Kenny has written a book on "Ceramic Sculpture, Methods and Processes," which is really a textbook but perfectly delightful, and for anyone working in ceramics an invaluable addition to their library. I shall give it to my granddaughter who is doing some work of this kind in the Southern Illinois University where her husband is working. I know she will find it as fascinating as I have.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL