My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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EN ROUTE TO NEW YORK—It was interesting to see in Denver an article describing in detail the plan of New York State Senator Thomas C. Desmond, who is chairman of the Joint Legislative Committee on the Problems of the Aged. It shows how important this problem has become throughout the country. It was surprising to see a New York State plan being given such coverage in a Colorado paper.

Senator Desmond's plan aims at the retention of old workers (which may mean workers as young as 45 years of age) so that they can adapt old skills to new machines or take up new occupations. It also urges counsel to help the older person find the proper job and effort to combat the prejudice against older men and women in labor. On this last point, of course, attention should be given to some of the insurance difficulties that companies face when their labor force consists of too many older people.

I was interested to see how much space is given to fashions in the papers of the Southwest and Far West. It seems to me that our metropolitan New York papers give much less attention to these fashion reports from different areas of the world. It may well be that in New York we are so much nearer the areas that create the fashions that it is not as interesting.

Wednesday evening was a delightful one for me as my granddaughter, Chandler Roosevelt, and my grandson, Elliott Roosevelt Jr., and my niece, Amy Roosevelt, came to dinner with me at the Brown Palace Hotel in Denver. We had a delightful time and were interested in the cowboys meeting there to plan for their year's schedule of rodeos.

During dinner one of the cowboys came over and presented me with a wonderful hat, beautifully made, that could be shaped in almost any style. I was almost tempted to pack it in my suitcase and bring it home, but I doubt if I would have much opportunity to wear it.

So I gave it to my grandson, who said that although it was a bit large for him he would find a specially good place to hang it on his wall. His favorite sport is riding and roping and he said that he knew many of the Texas cowboys who were in town for the meeting or stock show.

While in Denver I was glad to see Mr. and Mrs. Palmer Hoyt, who came to see me bright and early Thursday morning.

I have been trying to read many of the memorandums sent to me during the past few weeks. There seems to be a great concern among groups about economic plans that are proposed for Asia, and I hope this concern will really bring about some thinking and action in the present Congress.

Also, it is interesting to note that the Democrats have brought up the question of ratification of a treaty between the Formosa government and the United States. There are certain angles of that treaty that might someday cause the United States embarrassment and it is well that a careful survey is being made before any action is taken.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL