My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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DENVER—We had a very pleasant trip by air last Wednesday from Dallas to Corpus Christi although we had to change in Houston. We were fortunate to have a beautiful day and the flight into Corpus Christi was lovely.

Corpus Christi has grown very greatly since I was last there. The visit I remember best was the one I made with my husband on his way back from Mexico. We stopped there and visited at the naval base. I am told the base is much enlarged today, and certainly the mayor has a very rapidly growing city on his hands. He has all the usual municipal problems about schools and drainage and transportation and the financial difficulties in arranging bond issues and ways of making progress.

Soon after I arrived I was taken to a room in the hotel where we made a short radio-TV recording, and then I did four different radio recordings to be used in different ways. Among others, one was to be used for the March of Dimes. Texas is beginning its March of Dimes drive throughout the state.

Then there was a press conference after which I had a little time to get ready for dinner. Our dinner table had a unique centerpiece—a combination of many kinds of flowers and sea shells and seaweed. It was really very effective and different from anything I had ever seen before.

At 8:15 the meeting at which I was to speak was called to order. The committee was delighted with the attendance, having moved the meeting from the small auditorium to the new big one which holds 6,000 people.

Everyone was more than kind to me, and I think the audience could have gone on asking questions for a long time. The chairman of the meeting, Mr. John Lyle, however, passed a note that he thought more than an hour and a half of standing was inhuman, and we had better stop.

The following morning we took a plane to Denver and had a very good flight on a most beautiful day. The snow sparkled on the mountains and in the valleys. It was quite a jump from fairly warm Corpus Christi to really cold Denver. They have had some snow here, which rejoices the farmers, and they hope for a great deal more.

My niece, Amy Roosevelt, met us at the plane. I was sorry to learn that my son Elliott and his wife, who had hoped to be here, are not going to be able to come from their ranch, so I will miss seeing them.

The chief excitements here are the new governor and the meeting of the legislature. But almost as important is the National Western Stock Show, currently going on, where they hope to get an idea of the 1955 beef-price trends.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL