My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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DALLAS—After the television program on which we appeared at the University in Houston on Saturday we came back to the hotel and had a steak dinner because that seemed to be expected of us. They put on the menu four different kinds of beef.

It was interesting to see the program at the university directed by a girl student. The cameras and all other equipment also were managed by students. A faculty advisor was there and, of course, our moderator was the head of the department. This is very good training and the authorities at the university are proud that they sent 76 of their graduates into commercial positions this past year.

The country just outside Houston is rather gloomy, I thought, flat and very unattractive. As you progress on your journey, however, you find a little more rolling country and it looks more friendly. Most of the land which is not occupied by oil fields is grazing ground for cattle. But as we neared Dallas we saw some cultivated fields with some very bright green crops growing, and the region had almost a springlike look.

Judge Hughes and Mr. and Mrs. Fulton met us at the station along with some Democratic friends. On this trip, however, we are strictly nonpartisan, since the United Nations must belong to all the people of the United States and the support must come from everyone regardless of party.

On arrival at the Adolphus Hotel we went down to the Coffee Shop for lunch and I was much surprised to find the same woman showing me to my table that I had last seen in the Coffee Shop at the Park Sheraton Hotel, where I used to live in New York City. She told me her son had opened a ballet school in Dallas and so she had followed him to Texas and she loves it here.

Several people came up to speak to us while we were eating our lunch, among them a colonel who said he was just back from Korea.

These men of ours who have returned from the far distant areas of the world should be made use of at home in doing the difficult job of interesting more people in the conditions of other lands. When we at home hear and really know what is happening to people in other parts of the world we are deeply interested, but very often it is so hard for us to find out.

As I came off the train this morning a reporter asked me whether the imminent return of U.N. Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjold after five days in Peking meant he was successful or not. Of course, I had to say no one could possibly tell until the Secretary-General was willing to divulge what occurred. So far I have seen no inkling as to what he thinks will be the result of his trip.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL