My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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DALLAS—Our dinner in New Orleans Saturday night at Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Stern's provided me with both a surprise and a pleasure for I found that the other guests were Mr. Harper Sibley who was in the city to represent the United States Chamber of Commerce and Mrs. Frances Parkinson Keyes, the well-known author, who is an old friend of mine whom I had not seen in a long while.

Mrs. Keyes had written me that she was living in New Orleans and had done over General Beauregard's house and that it was really beautiful. Even so, I knew I would not have time to go over and see her on this trip, so I was delighted that Mrs. Stern had invited her to dine.

At the table the conversation turned to the columnists, and Mr. Stern volunteered that he read Doris Fleeson's column every day and thought her perhaps the best and clearest writer today on political questions. This pleased me and Mrs. Keyes, for both of us are very fond of Miss Fleeson and we concur completely in Mr. Stern's estimate of her ability to write clearly and astutely on the political questions of the day.

After dinner nearly 100 people came in, and before we left we had a provisional organization for the state as well as one for New Orleans being set up. Then, after this, we went to catch the night Sunset Limited, which took us to Houston. After breakfast at the Hotel Shamrock I went upstairs to a press conference which lasted nearly an hour in spite of the fact that two young reporters had greeted me at the station.

Later we all went to Rice Institute where outside the library, which is a charming room, a United Nations exhibit had been set up. The library was filled by people who were working in support of the U.N. in spite of considerable antagonism and opposition.

I was asked a number of times if I knew that Mrs. Oveta Culp Hobby's paper, The Houston Post, had done a wonderful series of investigations and reports on the Minute Women. Of course, no one interested in the U.N. could lack knowledge of this investigation and very useful series of articles which exposed the Minute Women, and I am very glad to have the full report, which will be kept for future reference.

Our first meeting ran from 10 o'clock to 12 o'clock at Rice Institute and was chiefly on matters on organization and cooperation of the Houston Council, which is an independent body, with our own American Association for the United Nations.

Then we went to lunch at the YWCA where Mr. Clark Eichelberger and I both spoke and then to a meeting in the auditorium of the "Y". This meeting was attended by some 225 persons—50 organizations being represented by at least two delegates each. This again was a question-and-answer session and had to come to an end around 4:15 because I had to return to the hotel and prepare to go to a TV interview.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL