My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HOUSTON—The AAUN meeting on Thursday evening in Little Rock was attended by over 2,000 people, and there was a delightful interlude of verses and tableaux. Mrs. Moore, our state chairman, had a meeting afterward with the heads of organizations, and plans were made to advance the whole state organization. They will use spot radio announcements to advertise a membership booth that will be set up in a downtown department store. Many of the state organizations agreed to put in their bulletins a story about the American Association for the United Nations and to print membership slips, and in all state and local meetings of their organizations the AAUN will be brought up and explained. Altogether I thought our chairman did a most wonderful job. They are already laying plans for the tenth anniversary, and I think that Arkansas will be one of the most interested states.

Mrs. Moore came yesterday to take us to the plane, and we had a smooth flight with about an hour's wait in Memphis between planes. During the time we were there I made a short radio recording and had quite a long interview with one of the newspaper reporters. Miss Margaret Valient also came to the airport to see me. Those who worked in Washington with the arts and crafts project during the depression will remember her and her talents. She is now back in Memphis with her father, and is working with the art academy there. She promptly volunteered to do some work for us. We have had a meeting in Nashville, Tennessee, but never in Memphis, so we are grateful for her interest. I was indeed glad to see her again, for she is the kind of warm person you never forget when once you know her.

We arrived on time in New Orleans. Mrs. Edgar Stern, Ralph Jackson, and a representative from the Mayor's office escorted us to a luncheon given by the Civic Committee, which is a combination of many organizations working together and the newly formed UNESCO Council. Both Mr. Eichelberger and I spoke, and then I went to a press conference and did a recording. From there we went to Mrs. Lemann's home, a beautiful old house, where she had a number of friends gathered to talk over the details of organization here. After a brief meeting I left, and Mr. Eichelberger remained to answer their questions and to try to get a chairman for a chapter here in New Orleans and perhaps a provisional state chairman.

Mrs. Stern brought Miss Baillargeon and myself back to her home. I stayed here last year when I spoke at Dillard University, and it is one of the most beautiful homes that I have ever seen. Mrs. Stern and Mrs. David Levy are sisters, and resemble each other in many of their mannerisms, interests, and in their great warmth and charm.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL