My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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LITTLE ROCK, Ark.—One of my New Year's resolutions is to concentrate more on fewer things and have more free time to spend at home. I am constantly overwhelmed by the flood of material that comes to me to be read, most of which I never have time even to go through hurriedly. When such a condition exists I feel the time has come when I must try to free myself and do fewer things better. So, I am going to give more time to the American Association for the United Nations and more time to my own home and friends, and less time to so many diversified interests.

On Tuesday I went to Washington on a very early plane—7:30 a.m.—so as to have an opportunity to see the house my son, James, has taken before attending a meeting of the National Issues Committee at 10 a.m.

I think my son was fortunate in finding a small house in such a delightful suburban location as Spring Valley. He can reach his office at the Capitol in 15 minutes from home by car and he is not too far out to use taxis and buses for transportation in any emergency.

Like so many small Washington homes, his place has charm and a little bit of outdoor space, and now he is looking for a dog. He has a kitten that is remarkably well-educated and companionable. She comes when she is called, and this is rare, indeed, for a cat. She is a much-traveled kitten, for she rode all the way with him from California.

When James was in Hyde Park for New Year's he had told me he was nearly settled and was glad he had come East before the opening of Congress to get his new office and home in order.

I was sorry I couldn't be in Washington for his swearing in, but I had to be in Kansas City on Wednesday for a meeting of the AAUN. These past few days have been very busy.

I had looked forward for some time to the Kansas City meeting and a visit with Mr. and Mrs. Truman. They were kind enough to ask me to go back with them to Independence to spend the night but, unfortunately, I had to journey on to here.

On this trip we are visiting areas we have not visited before and in some cases trying to line up state chairmen, so I am hoping very much that we will have a successful trip. On the way home I shall do some regular lectures and be back in New York, I hope, the afternoon of January 15.

In the meantime you will hear from me from many different parts of the country. I hope I can bring you some impressions, at least of the interest shown in international affairs and in the U.N. in general and the AAUN in particular. Our main concern is to try to strengthen the AAUN throughout the country so that more people will better understand and value the U.N. itself.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL