My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—I am amused sometimes by the questions that people bring me at my office.

One day this week a charming lady came in and said she had encouraged a high official from a foreign country to visit this country, that he had fallen in love with the United States and wished to return here, but he happened to have been born in a country from which the quota was practically nil.

The lady decided I was the person to consult as to whether, if the gentleman were completely determined, something special could be done. On the other hand, she seemed to feel that her gentleman friend might not be too wise to choose to come here, because in his own country he held an important place and in this country he would have to begin all over again. I assured her this was a question that required deep thought on the part of the gentleman rather than by me and that I had nothing to do whatever with entrance or exits into the U.S.

Therefore, I could only suggest that the gentleman consult any friends he might have made while in this country, either in the State Department or in any other government position.

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Someone else inquired the other day where I would recommend that they buy a Scottie that would have as sweet a disposition as my dogs have. Also, I am frequently asked what medicines I take, what shoes I wear, and how do I make decisions.

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From Los Angeles I have just had a very nice letter from a young man who was particularly pleased I had written a column about John Paton Davies.

He writes: "I knew John Paton Davies both in Chungking and in Moscow and had a high opinion of his reportorial abilities.... During my Embassy days in China, Davies and John Service were considered to have the keenest minds of anyone in the service out there. Both are now out of the service and I don't know how Mr. Service is making a living.... Both men are sons of China missionaries and were born in China."

It is interesting to hear how many people, who have been in the foreign service, are concerned about the action taken against Mr. Davies. Many of them are no longer in government work but they definitely feel our chances of having a good foreign service are impaired by the removal of competent people. Incidentally, this same Los Angeles man tells me that "churches in this state are now required to sign a loyalty oath or else pay taxes."

In the light of this I was interested to read that the First Unitarian Church of Los Angeles (the Unitarians do a great deal of charity work all over the world) is one of the churches that has refused to sign this oath and is paying its taxes under legal protest and is prepared to carry the case to the Supreme Court, if necessary.

Many of us will be watching to see what the outcome of this case will be, for it seems strange to ask the churches in this country to do such a thing.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL