My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—Last Saturday I had the pleasure of having Dr. Papanek of the Wiltwyck School and Mrs. Louis Weiss with two other guests lunch with me before going over to the school to visit.

I also paid a call on Mr. and Mrs. Hesselbarth whose ceramics shop back of the Hyde Park Playhouse is becoming one of the attractions to which I want to introduce all my guests. He is a delightfully original artist and they develop beautiful shapes and designs and original ideas for big and little gifts. I fell in love with some ash trays that can have whatever type of dog you prefer as a decoration, plus the name of the person to whom you are giving the ash tray. I chose black Scotties so that those to whom I give ash trays would always be reminded of where they came from. On my last visit I saw a new and original type of pitcher and a lovely bowl of fruit. His things are selling in Marshall Field's in Chicago now and I am delighted to be able to get such charming work done in my own neighborhood.

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There was a confirmation service at our church on Sunday but the class was such a big one that I decided it would be impossible to attend that as well as have an early supper and get into town at a reasonable hour. And since I began my day on Monday with a nine o'clock appointment it seemed wise to get back to New York early on Sunday evening.

My two little dogs are always sad when we leave the country. No more woods to roam in and rabbits to chase but they are always anxious to get into the car when they see it being loaded up. When all is said and done they would rather be with us in New York than be left alone in Hyde Park.

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I read with interest the other day the remarks of a visiting Congressman attending the Hemispheric Economic Conference in Rio de Janeiro as an observer for the House Foreign Affairs Committee. The Hon. James Fulton of Pennsylvania has quite evidently been impressed by the need of the Latin Americans for economic help and by the vast possibilities of development that any casual visitor to those areas is bound to see.

It is unwise, however, for any official representative of a country to promise what he is not sure of being able to deliver, and Mr. Fulton should know how difficult it is to get economic aid out of Congress. They are always ready to grant justifiable military aid but economic aid has been starved for some time. The Administration has been very cautious in its approach for more economic aid for Latin America, probably because they realize it is difficult to interest the Congress. Even a member of that body will find it difficult, though he is backed by those travelling with him and by some members of the Foreign Relations Committee.

I, personally, would be delighted to see military aid diverted to some extent into straight economic aid because I think economic aid is a better weapon against communism than much of the military aid which we provide to other countries. Still, I am afraid that an official should not raise the hopes of any Latin American country at the present time since it does not seem to me likely that these hopes of greater economic generosity will be realized.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL