My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Friday—On Monday of this week I went to speak at Lawrenceville School in New Jersey. This school is run more like English schools, with the boys living in separate houses according to age and with a house mother in charge.

I was to get off at Trenton and, because the train was such a fast one, I very nearly went on to Philadelphia, thinking I could not possibly have reached Trenton. Luckily, they came and told me there was someone looking for me on the platform and I grabbed my coat and got off.

I arrived at the headmaster's home and Mrs. Healy greeted me. A large group of boys from the senior form were having tea, as they do every day. We had a very pleasant time around the fire. Then came dinner, after which I spoke in the chapel to the upper form. The questions were excellent and I hope the boys enjoyed their evening as much as I did.

I arrived back in New York at 11:15 p.m., which for these little afternoon jaunts was a very reasonable hour.

On the way down I had a most-amusing conversation with a gentleman. He stopped to ask if I were getting off at Princeton Junction and then told me because he disagreed with all of my ideas he would like to carry my bag off the train! I had no bag to be carried but I asked him to sit down and tell me what he disagreed with. Whereupon he said: "I am a Republican from Connecticut," and then proceeded to talk about his family.

There was a boy at school in England and a fourteen-year-old at home who thought he knew all the answers to all the questions that come up, which is not unusual at fourteen. As far as I could see this gentleman and I agreed on most of the things he happened to touch on. Finally, I said I imagined our disagreement came on my economic philosophy but even that brought forth no arguments on his part and he left me to get off as much in the dark as to what we disagreed on as when we began to talk!

He was a very nice gentleman, however, and I enjoyed talking with him.

* * *

I had an appeal the other day which seems to me worth mentioning because all of us are interested in helping the people of South Korea to return to a normal existence. This is one of the voluntary agencies but it works with the U.N. Korean Relief Association. It is called "Houses for Korea". Its funds come from voluntary contributions, though the U.N. Korean Rehabilitation Agency also gave them funds last year.

Their great shortage is transportation equipment. They need an ambulance very badly. Their doctors and nurses cover, almost daily, an area of 38 small villages and give a long series of treatments for tubercular patients, do public health nursing, and meet general and emergency medical needs.

They do it in large part on bicycles or by jeep and they only have one jeep which is frequently needed on construction jobs, since they are also helping to rebuild some of the things which have been destroyed in the area. They can be reached at 580 Minnesota Avenue, San Jose, California.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL