My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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BEVERLY HILLS, Calif., Sunday—I went to my son James' office on Friday morning. There I had a chance to talk to his secretary and to see the pictures James has chosen to go with him to his new office in Washington. It is reminiscent of his father that pictures should be the most important things that are moving with him across the continent.

After lunch with him, I went to one of the film lots, and while there I paid a visit to the studio where Humphrey Bogart and Frederic March were rehearsing. As we stood there, one of the big light bulbs burst. No one was badly hurt. Mr. Bogart had a slight scratch on his forehead from which blood trickled down. But I saw no other casualty and was not even startled by the explosion which, though a little louder than that from an ordinary bulb, was not very unusual.

Little did I realize that the newspapers would seize on this mild excitement to give us some very hectic hours answering the telephone because of the reports that there had been some real danger present. This was all nonsense, but just showed me again how easy it is to create an excitement out of nothing.

Earlier in the day I heard Mrs. Robert Magidoff give a lecture on "My Discovery of America." With humor and pathos Mrs. Magidoff told the story of her background in Russia, how she came to America and how gradually she came to feel at home and to love this country and its people. She was speaking to the Friday Morning Club, which is a women's club, and I am sure no woman left that hall without a keener realization than ever before of what we in this country have, why we should be thankful for it and how important it is that we live up to our ideals in our citizenship.

In the afternoon I also had a chance to see an advanced stage of the new film made by Danny Kaye in a recent tour of Asian countries. He was interested in the children under the care of UNICEF, which is the Children's Fund of the U.N., and visited a great number of projects being carried on by this organization. He took a great many pictures that will be cut to make a 20-minute short, ready for release in December. The producers are donating the funds which come in from the various theatres to the Children's Fund. It will be called "Our Fifth Million Children" and I think it will prove of great interest to young and old alike.

Children in our high schools collected money through a program of "Tricks or Treats" on Halloween for these children whom they will see in the film. Here are Indian, Japanese, Korean, Burmese and other children, all with the appealing charm of childhood, but many of them in great misery. If you watch the children drinking their UNICEF milk made out of the powder that has come from the U.S., you will quickly get the sense of what hunger really means to these babies in faraway parts of the world. After watching these scenes, I am sure there will be many more of us urging our government to take part in this program which is now helping children all over the world.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL