My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Sunday—On Thursday afternoon I left for Boston to go to Brandeis University, where I delivered a lecture in a course given for seniors. Speakers are invited to come and tell, out of their own background, what were the character-forming experiences as they look back over their lives and what decisions they feel were important to their future.

I thought this would be an extremely difficult assignment and I was very much worried about it, feeling I had very little to contribute to these youngsters. But they asked such pertinent questions and seemed to get so much out of the little I could give, that it turned out to be for me an extremely enjoyable experience. In a way, it was an opportunity to evaluate the differences that can exist between generations who have had different types of education and training.

My next lectures at Brandeis University will be on the U.N., when I will try to give them a clear concept of the background, the present functioning and the hope for the future in this organization. I also hope to give them some knowledge about the specialized agencies, since it is rather rare that material on the work of these agencies falls into the hands of young people. A young schoolboy recently spoke to me about the difficulty of finding material on the U.N. which was of use to the teenage group. I think this is probably true, for a number of high school students have spoken to me about this before. A pamphlet which is now under consideration may prove to be the answer, but unfortunately it will be another year before this is published.

I had a rather stormy air trip back from Boston to New York on Friday morning, after having another hour's session with the Brandeis students before leaving. In spite of fog we got into New York at Idlewild and I was home in time for lunch with Raj Kumari Amrit Kaur, the health minister of India, and Ambassador Krishna Menon, head of the Indian delegation to the U.N.

It was a great pleasure to see Madame Kaur again and know that she is visiting our country. I hope very much that she will be allowed to see some things which will be of use to the people of India.

I have always admired Raj Kumari. I first saw her at a World Health meeting in Geneva, where she gave up a place on the executive committee after explaining that India had already held it for two years and had the benefit of greater knowledge through this position. She wished others to have this experience, and therefore voluntarily ceded India's place to another nation.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL