My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—On Monday I went down in the morning with Mr. Bernard Baruch to the Baruch School of Business Administration of the College of the City of New York. It is a fine building and one well adapted to the needs of the myriad students who filled its halls.

This was the autumn convocation and I was to make a short speech. Mr. Baruch was given a scroll of appreciation which also embodied a resolution inviting him to be a speaker at City College at any time, which is a broad invitation. He thanked them and was really pleased, I think, by their recognition. But what I liked particularly was that he addressed them as "fellow students" and this delighted his youthful audience.

My speech gave me a good opportunity to remind them that we are all students—young and old alike—as far as the world is concerned. Since I was talking to them about "Youth and the United Nations," this was an appropriate time to make them realize that at any age one could be a student in world affairs.

These young people at City College are very much alive and I was introduced by the head of the Students for Democratic Action, an affiliate of Americans for Democratic Action, which encourages young people to take an interest and an active part in the political life of their community. It seems to me essential that youth should begin to discuss the questions before their nation while they are still in college. Even if they cannot vote they can help, as many of these young people are doing, in encouraging people to carry out their citizen's obligations.

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I have heard, to my surprise, that it was very difficult in some areas of our city to find out where you go to register. This, of course, means that the political organization is not doing its usual efficient job. My recollection is that, in the past, in any public place you could find a list of the nearby registration places to help you in carrying out your civic duties.

It seems to me that the only excuse for the existence of the type of machinery to carry on politics which is set up in any large city is that, at least, it should be efficient, and if in any district the people can't find out where to register, the machinery is not being efficiently run. It may be that the powers that be have little interest in victory for their party this autumn, but if they really want to win they will make it possible for the voters to know where they should register.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL