My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—In the Rocky Mountain states the death of Senator Pat McCarran last week created a great deal of comment. His was a powerful voice in the Senate, and though he represented a state which had the smallest population of any state in the union, he had represented it for so long, and had pushed the causes in which he believed so vigorously, that he loomed as a most important figure.

Senator McCarran was chairman of the Judiciary Committee, which wields a great deal of power, up to 1953, but with the coming to power of the Republicans he lost the chairmanship. He remained, however, the senior Democrat of this committee, and had many close friends and supporters among the Republicans.

It is not a surprise to have seen in the papers that Senator William E. Jenner will seek a review of Senator McCarthy's censure case. They are close friends and it must, of course, be difficult for Senator Jenner to accept the censuring of his friend.

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I was delighted to see the other day that the State Department announced last Wednesday that it has engaged the American National Theater and Academy "to encourage and facilitate foreign tours by American entertainers and other groups in musical, theatrical and other fields."

Congress provided a five million dollar special fund in the last session for the purpose of enlargement of cultural programs and related activities. This will mean, it is hoped, that there will be better participation by the United States in trade fairs abroad. These have been used to great advantage by the Soviets, who have had better exhibits than the United States. This is true also of participation by the United States in contest exhibitions for showing of films abroad, and we have often been criticized for not taking more interest in these international meetings on various levels. Now this money will encourage private organizations and individuals to do more than they have done in the past. I think it will be of great value in increasing respect for the United States on a cultural level.

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All of our meetings in Pocatello, Idaho, were well attended. I missed Mr. Eichelberger on this trip, since, at the workshops, it meant that I had to answer all the questions and there are many things that he can answer better than I. Nevertheless, I think that the trip went extremely well. All of our state chairmen seemed to feel that they can start new chapters and increase their membership considerably.

At Pocatello there were at least eight other Idaho cities represented, both at the luncheon and at the workshop in the afternoon. In the evening, I judge that more than a thousand people attended the meeting after which, with Mr. Skeen and Dr. Robinson, Miss Baillargeon and I started on a long drive. It was much easier however, than flying and changing planes and dashing from airports to hotels and back again, ending up with a train trip to Laramie on Friday morning. Instead we drove until two a.m. and spent the night in Little America, the most spectacular motel I have ever stayed in. Each one of us had a suite of bedroom, sitting room, and bath; and even at two in the morning there was hot water. We had to get up, however, on Friday morning at six a.m., get our breakfast at the coffee shop which is open 24 hours a day, and get off about seven a.m. so we really only spent a little over three hours in bed.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL