My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Sunday—Our time in Helena, Montana, was fully occupied but I think I enjoyed the speech before the high school and the questions from the young people as much as anything that occurred there. We had some doubts as to weather, and the airlines reported that we might have trouble in landing in Butte and in flying out of Butte to Pocatello, Idaho. However, as the day progressed it began to clear and we ended by having a very good flight.

Even though we were rather late we were most grateful for not being grounded, since the drive we would have had to take was a very long one. Both in Montana and in Idaho we were in mountain country and I love the mountains. Pocatello is in a valley with mountains all around it. I found it a very charming small city.

A gentleman in Montana told me that when he went to New York he could hardly bear the crowds. He said the slowness of traffic made it essential to use the subways and when you got into the subways you felt that you would be crushed by the crowds of people. We who live in New York forget the impression that our crowded city makes. Someone else spoke about driving through the colored areas of Chicago, always with the feeling that people were crowded together like sardines in a can, and he felt the same way in New York's Harlem. But in those states which I visited there is plenty of room to breathe, and even with the increase in population that is still true. It is also true, thank goodness, of vast areas of the United States.

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The committee in Pocatello was kind enough to make no formal arrangements for Wednesday evening but certain members of the committee asked us to dine with them. The party also included Mr. D.A. Skeen and a Dr. Robinson, who had come from Salt Lake City.

Mr. Skeen is our regional director and lives in Salt Lake City, but has done valuable work in organizing in the mountain states. The activity which is now taking place out there is largely due to him and to the interest of our Salt Lake City members.

On Thursday morning the day's activities were opened by a breakfast of about 75 people, all of whom had signified their interest in the American Association for the United Nations. I spoke briefly explaining the reason for our work. Then Mr. Skeen and Dr. Robinson spoke, after which I answered questions.

After the morning meeting, there was a women's lunch as well as a men's lunch. Because Mr. Clark Eichelberger had been unable to make the trip with us, Mr. Skeen had to carry the ball and speak at the men's lunch.

In the afternoon, there was a workshop to which representatives of all the organizations in this region representing labor, agriculture, business, church, and women's groups had been invited. And in the evening, a public meeting was held in the auditorium of the high school.

We had planned to fly to Laramie, Wyoming, where we were due to start another busy day at noon on Friday, but Mr. Skeen arranged for a motor trip which would give us a little more time for sleep and I will tell you about that trip tomorrow.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL