My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Monday—I was much interested on Saturday to see in our newspapers a photograph of Dr. Niels Bohr and Mrs. Bohr. He is the famous Danish physicist and nuclear scientist whom I had the pleasure of meeting when I was in Denmark. He is a very wonderful man, and I think he voiced the feeling of many people when he was asked about his old friend, Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer. Dr. Bohr is in this country to address the National Industrial Conference in New York, which meets from October 13 to 15. I hope very much that I may have an opportunity to talk to him before he leaves.

The drive down from Burlington, Vermont to Hyde Park last Friday afternoon was very beautiful. The road we followed gave us glimpses of Lake Champlain and all about was rolling farm country, with hills in the distance most of the way. The foliage is just beginning to change color. It will be more brilliant after one or two heavy frosts, but I think you notice the brilliant reds and yellows of a few trees even more when there is green all about them.

I had been in New Hampshire and Vermont in the interests of the American Association for the United Nations. On Thursday, I met our new state chairman, Mrs. Beardsley, who is Senator Ralph Flanders' sister. Mrs. Beardsley had arranged a joint Vermont and New Hampshire meeting for the association and at the lunch it was announced that Mrs. Arnold would be our state chairman for New Hampshire. She is a very capable organizer and I am sure the two states will work closely together. They had expected only about 100 people at the luncheon, but 292 actually were seated. The hotel proprietor told me that he had rigged a loudspeaker to carry our talk outside of the dining room. He estimated that at least 200 people sat around the lobby and in the outer room listening to what we were saying about the United Nations and the AAUN.

I feel that it will be possible to have a strong state committee in both states, and gradually to build chapters in various parts of these states. It is tremendously encouraging to see an organization grow, and I was glad to be able to give Ambassador Warren Austin, who has done so much for his country in the United Nations, an encouraging report of the growth of the one organization in this country which is entirely devoted to acquainting people with the work of the U.N.

I was happy to find Ambassador Austin so much better. Both Mrs. Austin and the ambassador seem to enjoy the old family home and their delightful garden. The ambassador himself took me all over the garden and told me the history of every fruit tree. The six apple trees that Lady Reading sent him from England are growing beautifully. The Golden Delicious which I sent him on their golden wedding anniversary is flourishing. This garden is not just a garden. Ambassador Austin has a genius for friendship which was invaluable to his country during his term of service in the U.N., and his garden reflects that service.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL