My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Tuesday—What bad weather we have had! And the weatherman promised us good weather on Monday, but the day certainly didn't start very propitiously.

On Sunday afternoon the annual meeting held at the Starlight Roof of the Waldorf Astoria by the American Association for the United Nations in honor of the U.S. delegation proved to be a very good meeting, and well attended. Ambassador James J. Wadsworth, Jr., gave a very frank talk in which he told of the difficulties of our representatives in the U.N. and the problems that were likely to lie ahead.

The resolutions passed by the members of various organizations, who had attended the two-day sessions last weekend, were presented to Mr. Wadsworth. I think the most important resolution was the one urging our government to take the initiative in proposing a cease fire in the Formosa area.

The individuals who attended the weekend sessions voted, of course, as individuals, because there was no opportunity to consult with the boards of their organizations, but they will certainly do this in the near future. Many of these resolutions are in line with those passed at the mid-winter conference of more than 100 organizations, which was held the end of last February in Washington and will be held there again this winter.

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I happened to see in the exhibition room at the Carnegie Endowment building, on Sunday morning, a very delightful exhibition of paintings and sculpture, as well as some very beautiful photographs. This is apparently the first art exhibition of the Associated Philippine Artists and though it closed on Sunday there, I hope there will be other opportunities to see the works of this group.

On Sunday evening we went to the City Center to see the New York City Ballet. I had never happened to see this group of gifted young artists before and I enjoyed the evening very much, as did apparently the whole audience. There was great enthusiasm, and quite evidently this was a discriminating audience that had studied the individual dancers, and gave great applause to their favorites. In some ways the audience seemed more like one you would find abroad in its enthusiasm and in its evident study of the performers.

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Vice President Richard Nixon seems to think that ex-President Harry S. Truman is running in the present campaign! I see in the headlines every morning he is making Mr. Truman the target of his speeches. The Vice President is evidently forgetting that the Republicans have now been in office twenty months. That is time enough to make a record which should be given first consideration.

I will concede that the Vice President is a clever campaigner but I have watched a good many of his campaigns and I think it is wise for the public to analyze his statements rather carefully. It may be interesting to see in this election whether it is the past twenty months, or the years previous to that, which have made the deepest impression on the voting public.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL