My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Thursday—On Monday last Mr. Don Pryor of the National Issues Committee brought his family to lunch with us here and he told me that at last the "Issues," which gives in brief what is happening in Congress and in various fields of interest nationally and internationally, is now on a permanent basis. The bulletin can be bought on a subscription basis at $5.00 per year.

This is good news, for I find that many people are delighted to have concentrated facts at hand, without too much opinion, so that they are free to decide for themselves what they think. Beginning with next month the National Issues Committee will be able to get out a one-page fact sheet giving a detailed account of one particular subject, such as housing, education or social security.

After a brief swim the Pryors left just as the cast from the Hyde Park Playhouse came down for a swim and tea. Monday is the one night there is no performance, so the players can get away for a free afternoon. They are a very hard-working group, and I was happy to learn that Mr. "Buddy" Rogers drew such big houses last week that the show played to capacity every night.

I had been wanting Mr. John Golden to see this setup because I think it is very attractive and a good summer stock company. So, I was delighted when he called early Tuesday morning and said he would motor up for lunch. After lunch we went up to the dress rehearsal for "High Tor," which is the play they are doing this week. It is one of the plays that I particularly like because in a way it deals with conservation, which is one of the things I am particularly anxious to have everybody in this country think about.

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I was quite interested to find that Mr. Richard Neuberger, who has been a State Senator in Oregon and is this year running for the U.S. Senate, is making conservation one of the chief subjects in his campaign. Instead of giving away the usual match cases with slogans written on them, he is giving away seed and asking the hunters as they hunt to sow it on the upland ranges.

His opponent and incumbent, Mr. Guy Cordon, was one of the strong supporters of the tidelands oil bill and also is the author of a bill that would allow large lumber operators to take over choice acreage inside the national forests (Senate 85). Mr. Ira N. Gabrielson of the Wildlife Management Institute has called this bill "one of the crudest attempted land grabs in recent years..."

A retired U.S. forest chief, Mr. Lysle F. Watts, is heading a group called, "Conservationists for Neuberger." Since he was for 38 years a forester, it is evident that he feels conservation in the Northwest is important.

I wish we could have a campaign based on these interests all through our country. I think it would help very much.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL