My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Tuesday—I was interested in several important resolutions passed by the National Education Association, which recently held their 92nd annual convention in New York City. I was particularly glad that they spelled out what they hoped for from Federal aid.

They said they hoped that Federal aid to the states would raise the salaries of teachers, and that this aid would be channeled through the U.S. Office of Education and the regular state educational agencies. They pointed up the shortage of teachers which exists and the inadequate training provided for many teachers. I think everyone should put whatever influence they have behind any movement to overcome these conditions.

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In spite of the rather gloomy weather here at Hyde Park over the holidays, it cleared enough for us to get a swim and to lie in some rather uncertain sunshine for a brief period.

We all went to look at an art exhibit at the new summer theatre, which has been opened this year in what was once the Frederick Vanderbilt farm buildings north of Hyde Park village. There were some paintings from Dutchess County painters and a wonderful collection of photographs by local photographers. There were also a few pieces of fine ceramics. And on one table was the usual kind of creation done by the pupils in the Hyde Park school. The children had done good work but it did not seem to me that anyone showed genius!

One evening eight of us went to our first performance at the Hyde Park Playhouse. They have a permanent company here, and I think they are very ambitious for they did Shaw's "Pygmalion." It was really enjoyable and, on the whole, well done. The playhouse itself is very attractive and would, I think, be cool even on a hot night.

No one in this area can complain that the holiday was too warm. We have been having open fires every evening and early morning—which, in July, is hard to believe.

I am rejoicing in the cool weather, for I have a real piece of work to do. My son and daughter-in-law have brought their books from New York and they want me to remove all the books I have kept in their cottage. This means really going over all mine and deciding which books I want to keep permanently on my own shelves and which I am willing to send either to our little local library or to libraries in other parts of the country.

I find myself, of course, having to read portions of different books to make up my mind whether I really want to put them beyond easy reach. I suppose everyone should do this in their library once a year, but I haven't done it for quite a while and I am finding it quite an occupation.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL