My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK. Monday—Poor Senator McCarthy! He must be feeling much in need of support.

One of his ardent backers has just sent me a clipping of a newspaper article written by William F. Buckley, Jr., co-author of the book, "McCarthy and His Enemies." In one paragraph of this article, it is interesting to find the famous Dreyfus case dragged in and McCarthy likened to Dreyfus.

During the period of that case I was abroad as a schoolgirl in a French school, and I heard a great deal about it. I would have thought that some of the Senator's victims could more logically be put in a class with Dreyfus than the Senator himself. McCarthy is a pretty lucky person, even if his followers do feel the need of defending him so violently.

Those who have a serene sense of their own clear conscience usually do not feel it is important either to be defended or to defend themselves very violently, and I can only judge that there is a certain uncertainty about the Senator—or his friends would not be so vociferous in his behalf.

The same gentleman who sent me this article about McCarthy informs me that a factual and unslanted biography of myself is being published this year. I am interested, since neither I nor my family nor friends have heard anything about this biography—and I don't see how anyone could write a biography without consulting one's family or friends. Perhaps, to keep it unslanted, the material might be taken entirely from certain unbiased columnists and writers. I may be as interested as my correspondent in the result!

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I wonder how many people have seen the July issue of The Courier, which is published monthly by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. It is particularly interesting to those who want to know the problems of other nations and what is happening in other parts of the world. There are many photographs and illustrations, and here you can find the story of what is being done by the specialized agencies of the U.N. Their story is so seldom told in the regular press that it is a wonderful thing to have it written up in this UNESCO publication.

I think anyone would find this magazine interesting and very readable, and it would certainly be encouraging to find that the people of our country as a whole were interested enough in the people of the world to read a magazine dealing largely with other parts of the world.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL