My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

HYDE PARK, Tuesday—The other evening, when I spoke at a PTA meeting at Pine Plains, N.Y., I heard a great deal of comment on the McCarthy-Army hearings, particularly about the recent dramatic interchange between the Senator and Joseph N. Welch, the Army counsel. I was astounded at the feeling that evidently had been aroused by the Senator's cruel and reckless accusations against a young man in Mr. Welch's office.

Almost everyone who spoke to me said that about the only value the hearings had was in making them understand the type of person this Senator really is. They seemed to feel at last the danger that exists in any personality which is interested primarily in acquiring power and utterly disregards the rights of other people.

* * *

This past weekend, I had a very interesting day. In the morning, the president of the Trap Rock Corporation took me down to their quarries near here. It was interesting to see the work that they do. The stone quarried there is particularly hard and is used largely in making roads and cement.

They had picked out a particular piece and polished it, leaving the outline of the State of New York and marking Hyde Park on it. This stone was presented to me to give to the chairman of the Georgia State Commission for the Little White House in Warm Springs. He was present and accepted the stone to place with others—from the 48 states—which form a walk at the little house where my husband lived, on the grounds of the Warm Springs Foundation.

It was a very fine gesture made by the company which presented this stone, which will be a constant reminder, at Warm Springs, of the state where my husband was born and grew up and where he lived most of his life. He always felt that Warm Springs was his second home, so I think it would please him very much to know that this stone would be a link between the two homes which meant so much to him.

* * *

I was back home in time to go over to the Memorial Library to escort over to my house the car in which Madame Mehta, the wife of the Indian Ambassador, and a friend had come up from New York to visit the Library and our old home. After a very pleasant lunch, they left.

In the afternoon, I spent a little while with another guest, George Randall of North Hollywood, California, talking over some plans which the Los Angeles chapter of the American Association for the U.N. has conceived for the celebration of the tenth anniversary of the U.N.

That evening, Mrs. Skitch Henderson (Faye Emerson) and her son Scoop drove up from New York, bringing Mr. and Mrs. John Roosevelt with them. Mrs. Henderson is rehearsing a play in Westport, Conn., so had to leave at noon on Sunday. Therefore, on Sunday morning, we had a large family breakfast out on my porch, with all the children and grown-ups of the neighborhood, to celebrate belatedly my grandson Haven Roosevelt's birthday, which had been a week before, and also Scoop's birthday, which actually had been the day before.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL