My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—I am happy to see that President Eisenhower is looking for a way to get the international atomic pool started even if the Soviet Union does refuse to participate. In the end, I feel, the Russians will have to come in if the other nations involved prove that they are willing to give materials from their own resources to an international organization for the development of the peacetime uses of atomic energy.

It seems to me that it would go far toward quieting the fears of the world if we could begin to see some constructive use for this very destructive power. The National Council of Women, representing many women's organizations, came out in favor of efforts to develop this power, and I believe the President would have wide acclaim from the world if this work could be started under the auspices of the United Nations.

I am also glad that the President insisted that the public hearings in the Army-McCarthy dispute should be continued. It would have been very unfair not to give the other side the same opportunities Senator McCarthy already has had. In the course of these future hearings, the much discussed monitored conversations should be brought out since apparently they throw light on the attitude of mind and the conduct of the Senator and his aides in dealing with members of the Executive department.

I spoke in Paterson, N.J., on Wednesday night. I was delighted to find that Thursday was a fairly peaceful day, with a much-traveled French friend turning up for luncheon. Dr. Jean Nussbaum and I became acquainted during the first session of the U.N. in London. He represents a number of small religious groups in Europe. As far as I can see, he has covered the world in the interests of freedom of religion for such small groups as the Seventh Day Adventists, and I find him an interesting reporter on world conditions.

The National Citizens Commission for public schools wires me that they will devote the Monday, May 24th program on their radio series, "Doorway to the Future," to the question of "The Negro and the Schools." The Citizens Commission is trying to take up important issues in a very objective way, and at the present time it would be valuable to have a calm and clear coverage of this question. From the papers one gathers that, on the whole, all the states affected by the recent Supreme Court ruling are considering the matter carefully and trying not to make hasty decisions. This is as it should be, and I hope many people will be able to listen to this program over the ABC network at 9:30 p.m., E.D.T.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL