My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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ATHENS, Ohio—We will know before long whether the Soviets mean to let anything of importance happen at Geneva. They are still trying, apparently, in spite of the joint refusal of the United States, Great Britain and France, to have Communist China recognized as a great power.

All other powers having agreed that Communist China should come only as one of the belligerents, would have considered that they were bound by that commitment once they had made it, but the Soviet Union always considers that nothing which displeases them is settled. They always begin again in the hope that someone will grow tired and they will get their own way.

If this is the pattern that runs through the whole conference, it will be a long and tedious one. We will not know until the very end whether anything can be accomplished. All we can do is to hope, be watchful and keep our powder dry.

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Just in a week, spring is with us. Last Saturday I drove to Westchester County and all of the blossoms were out. Dr. Gurewitsch and I went with Mr. Baruch on a visit to Blythedale Hospital. Dr. Gurewitsch is the medical director there and he was anxious to show Mr. Baruch the experimental work being done for handicapped children.

There are children in plaster casts lying on their stomachs. There are others lying on their backs and many who look perfectly normal but who have some disease which requires bed rest and treatment. There are others with deformities of one kind or another, but for all of them treatment is being administered. The experimental part is the effort to find out how to treat the whole child so that one handicap will not mean that the child acquires several handicaps during the years required for a cure or for amelioration of the condition that he may suffer from.

I saw, in walking around, great improvements in the training of the staff since I had been there a few years ago, and much had been done to develop the specific things needed by certain children. They were dedicating last Saturday a dental clinic with a movable chair so that a child who was in a bed could be wheeled in and treated without leaving his bed. They had also enlarged and improved the examining room so that one felt the doctors had a much better opportunity to make really satisfactory examinations of their patients. Altogether, I thought the board of directors and the administration director were doing a fine piece of work in cooperation with the medical director.

Dr. Gurewitsch has with all his patients, but especially with children, a very remarkable intuitive way of knowing what they need. They are taking advantage now of psychiatry for the children but I think every doctor practices psychiatry, even though a specialist is essential to help fully meet the needs of the patients.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL