My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Sunday—I feel that sometimes I must sound too optimistic to my readers, but I can only say that our visit at Eau Claire, Wisconsin, seemed from beginning to end a most successful part of our trip. The morning meeting was well attended by people interested in AAUN and other organizations wanting to work with the association. The luncheon was held in a church hall and attended by 428 people, all the room would seat. Then we went over to the auditorium, where 2,000 people came to the meeting. I hope that everyone became a member of the association. Since a great many other communities were represented, I feel that we started a good deal of activity in several places.

We drove from Eau Claire to St. Paul, and I thought that on arrival I would have a very short time in which to dress. But the television people had set up their equipment in my room, and I had to give them a few minutes before I even had a chance to take my dress out of the bag and see if the creases would shake out. My friend Adele Enright, who always greets me in St. Paul, was on hand. She met us again on Friday morning at 6:40 at the train and took us to her home for breakfast before we got on the plane back to New York. It was a pleasure to have Dr. and Mrs. Mayo come up to St. Paul for the dinner and the evening meeting. The dinner was chiefly for members of the association, but about 2,000 people came to the evening meeting, a very successful one.

On Wednesday, kindly Mr. Melamed came to have breakfast with us at 8 and took us to the plane. These short trips taken in two-engine planes are usually a good deal rougher than a long trip, when you can go to any height seeking less turbulent atmosphere. We had a fairly bumpy trip from St. Paul to Huron, South Dakota. We were a little late in arriving, but went straight to a luncheon where a very representative group of people from churches, colleges, schools, the Chamber of Commerce, the Junior Chamber of Commerce, the Farm Bureau, the Farmers' Union and the AFL were all on hand.

The Junior Chamber of Commerce invited me to return in May to judge a contest—a beard-growing contest. The gentleman who handed me the invitation had grown the most remarkable kind of beard, branching out from his mustache in a carefully-cut curve up to his ear. It gave him a rather peculiar appearance, I must say. He himself was conscious of this, for he told me that he thought he had devised the strangest kind of beard to grow.

There was a press conference, a recording and a television kinescope, and then I attended the workshop on UNESCO for a few minutes. All of this indicates that a great deal of interest in the United Nations has developed throughout this state. I feel more and more encouraged as we travel from one state to another.

The other night, in the few minutes before I fell asleep, I read a little book by Charlotte and Dabney White of Greensboro, North Carolina, entitled "Needed: A Miracle for Tomorrow—The Vanguard Plan." It is an appeal for world government to be arrived at through the United Nations by 1960, but I think you might find the little booklet interesting to look through, and certain suggestions are stimulating.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL