My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SIOUX CITY, Iowa, Friday—On Tuesday afternoon we drove from Cleveland to New Philadelphia, Ohio, and I spoke that night in Dover. These two cities are so close together that they are practically one, and there are other nearby cities, so that this is quite a little center. I was there as the guest of the Business and Professional Women and this was the first lecture that they had ever sponsored.

It was raining as we left Cleveland and my hostess was worried about her evening meeting but it stopped raining and four or five of the ladies invited us to dine at the country club which is perched on top of a high hill and gives one beautiful views of the hills of that part of Ohio. We had a delicious dinner, and then on arriving at the auditorium the ladies were relieved to find that the audience was satisfactory.

They had a question period which was fairly lively, and then we went back because on Wednesday morning we were to leave there at 7:30 a.m. The weather had really cleared and the air was balmy, speaking of spring. We changed our plane in Omaha and had a very rough flight to Sioux City, but in spite of the wind which was very strong in both places, it was still soft and fairly warm.

Our hosts here, the college students of Morningside College, told me that a week ago they had snow. This is a coeducational, liberal arts, Methodist college and I gather the majority of students are preparing for teaching in some particular field. Physical education is very popular but some are planning to teach English and some are training to teach in elementary schools. They have a number of foreign students.

I plunged at once on arrival into a press conference which was attended by a large number of students. After a scant 20 minutes to ourselves, we had dinner with the students in the hall where we are staying. My talk was at 8:00 p.m. followed by questions and later a reception. Thursday morning we left at 9 and took a plane for Kansas City.

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This is the month of the Easter Seal campaign which terminates on Easter Sunday, and during this month we are all asked to contribute to provide treatment and care for children and adults crippled by accident or disease.

There is one form of handicap which is not usually recognized and yet more children suffer from speech defects than have crippled limbs. The best estimates place the number of children who have to have aid to remedy speech defects at 3,500,000. There are 117 speech programs throughout the nation sponsored by the Easter Seal societies but they only reach the worst cases. Many children, of course, need surgery.

One little boy came to a plastic surgery clinic of the New York Hospital to receive help from the cleft palate program. At first, he sat apart with his head in his arms, rarely talked with the other children. Now, after a year of special therapy, he is friendly and talkative and on the way to becoming a normal child. All of us want to help in this work, so find out about your local Easter Seal society.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL