My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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CLEVELAND, Ohio Thursday—President Eisenhower's speech this week was planned to reassure the country. He said, "I don't mean to say, and no one can say to you that there are no dangers. Of course, there are risks if we are not vigilant.

"But we do not have to be hysterical. We can be vigilant. We can be Americans. We can stand up and hold up our heads and say 'America is the greatest force that God has ever allowed to exist on his footstool.'

"As such it is up to us to lead the world to a peaceful and secure existence.

"And I assure you we can do it."

Those are encouraging words, but they are also a challenge. The President tells us we can do the job that lies before the people of the country today, but we have to do it.

It is a curious thing that more and more as the United States accepts its position of world leadership it is evident that the people must bear the greatest burden. They cannot expect their government to do it alone.

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Upon reaching Cleveland, I met my secretary, Miss Doris Muller, and we worked to clear up the mail which she brought me. I am the guest of the Jewish Welfare Fund and spoke at their federation luncheon.

As I circled Cleveland coming in from Chicago, it seemed to me that this was a city of suburbs. The big city concentrates in a rather small area and all around seemed to be suburban homes with trees and gardens which make for a very attractive city from the air.

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My week of travelling for organizing purposes for the American Association for the United Nations came to an end with our day in Reno. I think on the whole this West Coast trip shows that people have done a great deal of work since our trip last autumn. Building an organization of this kind goes slowly, but there certainly is an increase in chapters everywhere and an increase in membership. Two months ago when Mr. Sweatt went back to Nevada to start organizing as state chairman there was practically nothing there. Today they are certainly conscious of the need to know about the U.N. and to back it up and they are at work to widen their membership and start chapters all over the state. Their population is small but they have one city, Wells, where the quota is only 60 members and they already have 36, so 24 more and they will be over the top as the first city in the country to meet its quota.

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This coming week I shall be doing a few lectures before attending the Americans for Democratic Action national convention in Chicago.

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Many people in the United States are grieved at the news of the death of Princess Martha of Norway. She and her children came to this country for refuge during the war and with her husband she visited various parts of our country. Everywhere she made the most delightful impression and those of us who were privileged to know her well will never forget her charm and dignity and kindness.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL