My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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RENO, Nevada, Sunday—The flight from Portland to San Francisco was speedy and uneventful, with some beautiful glimpses of snow-covered mountains on the way down. Our day in Oregon was a full one, and it was gratifying to have such keen interest shown in the United Nations. The meetings were all well attended, and when open to the public there was an overflow audience. The Northwest is certainly a part of the country where young people have a great opportunity. I was astonished to find how many returned GI's who had been stationed here during the war had come back, married and settled down in the Northwest.

We arrived in San Francisco and went at once to an afternoon meeting in San Mateo, which was very well attended. Then we drove in to San Francisco and were ready for a dinner at seven planned by Mrs. Henry Grady. Mr. Zellerbach, who has taken the chairmanship for San Francisco, was present and the dinner was presided over by Dr. Deusche. It was an outstanding success. I was particularly happy that Mrs. Grady has agreed to help us, for I know that she can see to it that the local organization accomplishes even more than they have in the past. Fred Cromwell is actively working with the association on a full-time basis, which will mean a great deal.

It is astounding how many people will work as volunteers because they feel that this is one of the most vital things that must be done for the good of the country. The organization here has carried on an information center since August, 1949. Paul Verdier, president of the City of Paris department store, donates the space, the desk, and the fixtures, and furnishes many of the store's services free. The director, Miss Lillian Phillipes, carries on an extraordinary number of activities with the center, which is open Monday through Saturday. It is run by 14 volunteers, eight of whom have served since it opened, a record of nearly five years of faithful service. In New York, a center of this kind is run by Women United in the Carnegie Building, where the U.N. has its offices. And everywhere you have this type of center, information and help on the U.N. activities is always available.

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I notice by the papers that the President has signed the bill slashing Federal excise taxes by a billion dollars a year. It now remains to be seen whether business will so improve that the government loss will really be cut. This will take some time to discover.

I have also carefully read the explanation given about the H-bomb. Nowhere have I seen it suggested that perhaps some new rules should be worked out in connection with the Japanese request, yet I think it important that this request receive consideration. It is evident that we do not know beforehand the exact results of these experiments. Therefore there should be ample warning so that no fishermen and no other people would be in the area. I think also there should be an assurance with each new experiment that the United States is willing at any time to negotiate within the United Nations for the control of these great and destructive forces. They are forces to hold in the background to prevent war, but a satisfactory agreement for inspection and control in every area of the world would be an even greater safeguard.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL