My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

PORTLAND, Ore. Thursday—Before I tell you about our trip, let me just say that on Saturday night in New York City we went to the Phoenix Theatre to see "The Golden Apple" and found it altogether a delightful musical performance. I congratulate Mr. John La Touche and Mr. Jerome Moross for having done a clever and enjoyable play to music. It is well acted and the singing is good.

* * *

I also went for a short time to the Spence-Chapin Adoption Service meeting. It was a meeting of a special committee to consider the difficulties of adoption for dark-skinned children of our city. And I thought it was a most interesting and rewarding meeting, for the people were facing all the difficulties that confront the adoption of any child plus the difficulties that exist where the child is of dark color, or of some foreign race or nationality. Some very moving stories were told by parents who have adopted children and I was impressed by the general service rendered by the organization and the opportunity which existed to bring happiness not only to the child but to many parents who might never have had the joy of feeling that they have a child of their own.

* * *

And now let me tell you about the trip from New York City to Oregon, which proved somewhat eventful but ended with only an hour's delay. It was a surprise to land in Chicago and find several inches of snow, with the storm still going on. We had been told on the way out that we might not be able to land at all, in which case we would have gone to Omaha, but we did land a little late and we made our connection with the other plane which was also a little late. So we proceeded on our way to Denver and Portland.

Just before reaching Denver, the captain of the plane told us that one engine was not behaving properly and, of course, they would take no chances on safety and so he could not tell us when we would leave Denver. On arrival, however, they at once told us that there was another plane which had enough empty seats to take us all on board and that would proceed to Portland in a half hour. This was welcome news and we were also glad to learn it was clear on the Pacific Coast and that we would have no trouble landing. Our kind hosts waited for us, even though it was nearly midnight when we landed here.

I slept a good deal on the way out, for, after all, according to New York time it was really three o'clock in the morning when we landed. We had a short interview with a reporter from the morning paper and a picture was taken and then we went to the hotel and I was thankful to go to bed. At eight o'clock we were called for to go over and do a radio recording. Mr. Capper-Johnson, the president of the Oregon United Nations Association, and Mr. Eichelberger seemed as refreshed as though they had not been up late but I am not sure that I could give quite that impression—it was a beautiful day, however, and I very soon woke up to an interest in the city and the purpose of our visit.

This is always called the "City of Roses" and there were roses in my room which reminded me of that fact on my arrival. After the recording we held a two-hour meeting with members and officers of the United Nations chapters throughout the region, and many interesting questions were asked. There were 16 cities represented from this area, and I could not help thinking that it would be valuable if Mr. David Lawrence could be with us.

I will take up his article tomorrow, point by point, because he is not the only one who holds views about the U.N. which I think are naive, and yet he thinks those of us who differ with him are either naive or purposely misleading the American people.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL