My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—Tuesday night I went to see Audrey Hepburn and Mel Ferrer in "Ondine." Alfred Lunt has done a wonderful job of directing and I thought the play was most beautifully staged, and furnished one with a delightful evening. I felt that as the water sprite in the first act, Miss Hepburn's movements were a little too stylized but perhaps that was done on purpose. As the play progressed, the motions became more flowing and like those which I personally attach to the idea of a water sprite.

This play is poetry and very lovely. I think perhaps the most interesting thing is that New York audiences are captivated by such fantasy. Perhaps it shows that we like some of our profound observations about human beings to be sugarcoated!

On Wednesday I went up at noon to a luncheon of Columbia Phi Alpha Delta law fraternity and had the pleasure of talking with Dean Warren who told me he saw my son, Franklin, every now and then. I also found among the students Congressman Javits' son and a young relative whom I did not at first recognize.

The students were interested in a discussion of civil liberties and the international aspects as well as the domestic ones. Here is a group that will soon be the young lawyers working their way up in various communities throughout the country and I think it is most interesting to see what inquiring minds they have and how ready they are to consider at least new ideas. I wonder if as we grow older we can keep that balance and the element of curiosity which makes us look at new things objectively.

I sat next to Mr. Paul Hoffman not long ago at a lunch and he told me about a very interesting development that was going on in the Studebaker plant and today I received one of the letters sent out about this particular undertaking. It is addressed by the president of the Studebaker Corp., Mr. H. S. Vance, to all Studebaker dealers. He says:

"On February 3rd an event of significance in the annals of management and labor took place in Studebaker's South Bend plant. I consider it of such importance that I am taking this opportunity to tell you about it. On that day I, as president of the Studebaker Corp., together with the president of the Studebaker Union, Local No. 5 UAW—CIO, affixed the first gold seal on the windshield of a newly-manufactured car." This shield says: "We stand behind the quality of this car." He adds: "Both management and workers in our plants use this quality code program as a rededication to the century-old tradition of Studebaker craftsmanship."

Mr. Vance is right, it is a step forward in labor-management organization when both agree to work for quality. They have their separate interests as must be so in every industry. Labor must work for the rights and interests of labor; management must strive to get as much as it can for its investors. But there are areas in which the two can work together and more and more of these areas should be developed.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL