My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

WASHINGTON—In New York, on Thursday night, I attended a party given by Samuel Barlow for Dr. Pope and the members of the staff and trustees of the Asia Institute. The institute had to close its doors because the money could not be raised for it to continue, but it has a fine record, having graduated many fine students and having made a good contribution to American knowledge of Asia in general. The staff accomplished unbelievable things under very difficult conditions, and I am sure it is heartbreaking for Dr. Pope to see the institute, which he founded and carried on his shoulders for so long, finally come to an end. The suggestion was made that an association be created of the students and faculty and such trustees as desired to join, and that occasionally they meet. I hope this is carried out, for there are a great many worthwhile people in the group and it would be advantageous to bring them together from time to time.

On Friday morning I met with Women United, an organization of women observers at the U.N., representing different national organizations. One guest was present from Australia, representing the United Country Women of the World. I was there to try to tell them some of my observations about public opinion in this country on the U.N. I have traveled a great deal this year within the U.S., but I find it difficult to gauge just what the state of public opinion is. On the whole, I think people are gaining in their interest in the U.N. and are becoming anxious for more information.

I was then asked about the work of the American Association for the U.N., and I was glad to tell them what we had done and what we hoped to do. I hope these women will send me their observations as to the success of our work, for they are traveling in different parts of the country and have many contacts with groups working for the U.N.

I received a pamphlet the other day which I think may be of interest to many people. It came from the National Citizens Commission for the Public Schools. This commission will supply information to anyone who has local school problems on which he would like to consult with experts. They have films to distribute. They publish a monthly newsletter. They are prepared to put you in touch with other people in your locality concerned with public schools.

There are many other services which you can obtain by writing to their headquarters at 2 West 45th Street, New York City, or, if you know where it is, you can write directly to your regional office.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL