My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—On Monday, I had the pleasure of attending a luncheon at the Waldorf given by Mayor Wagner to the President of Turkey and his wife. The Ambassador from Turkey was there and I was glad that so many people came to greet the President and express in this manner their admiration for the part that Turkey has played in recent history.

Mention was made of the way Turkey has resisted any aggression and of the fact that her soldiers were among the first to join the United Nations forces in Korea. I regretted only that no one had the time to tell some of the stories I have been told about the courage of these soldiers. Our U.S. soldiers coming back from the front spoke of their bravery and dependability.

In Tokyo, where they were cared for in American hospitals by our doctors and nurses who did not know their language, the Turkish soldiers earned for themselves the greatest respect because of the way in which they bore pain without complaining. I heard of one doctor who told a story of the difficulties of communication and treatment which perhaps my readers may not have heard.

The doctor was trying to discover just where a wounded Turkish soldier felt the most acute pain, but during the examination neither of them could explain to the other their desires or their feelings. The doctor hoped that from the man's expression he could tell when the pain was intense, but he reckoned without his patient, whose face never changed and who never made the slightest sound to indicate his feelings. The only information he was able to elicit was "me Turk." This experience must have been frustrating to the doctor but apparently in spite of it the man recovered!

I attended a board meeting of the American Association for the U.N., this week, at which Dr. Charles Mayo was elected president of the Association. Dr. Mayo served as one of the members of the United States delegation to the last General Assembly. He is much interested in international affairs and is especially concerned about the value of the U.N. and its effort to bring about peace in the world. I know that his presidency will bring great strength to the association and the board elected him unanimously with a great feeling of pride that he was coming to work with us.

Monday evening I went to see "The Remarkable Mr. Pennypacker," and I recommend it to anyone who wants to spend an amusing evening. Mr. Pennypacker and his "free thinking and free acting" might have serious results if it did not all turn out to be so funny and in the end so full of sweet reason. Burgess Meredith is delightful, the perennial youth who apparently never grows up. I rather enjoyed Grandpa Pennypacker with his constant rages, but all of them, including the children, are entertaining, and it is a light and pleasant evening's entertainment.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL