My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Friday—Coming down from Montreal to Ft. Edward, New York, in a snowstorm was most beautiful. Clean, white snow lay over every field and every tree was laden down. In this part of the country many of the trees are evergreens or birches and it makes the landscape very beautiful when the snow falls.

Lake Champlain was covered with ice and the snow blanket lay over it thick and smooth, but about an hour before we reached Fort Edward the snow stopped and a rainy drizzle started in. When we got out, we walked along the train on a glace of ice to the automobile, but once on the road the ice seemed to disappear.

I have been in Glens Falls many times, but never at the hotel. We were very comfortable while there and I am glad that we decided after the dinner and lecture and reception to go on to New York by train since it did not look as though there would be any ceiling for planes to take off from Albany and land at LaGuardia in the middle of the night!

The Forum in Glens Falls was very well run and the question period was particularly interesting. I think there has evidently been considerable education in the work of the U.N., which always pleases me very much. Both the dinner and the reception were very pleasant and in spite of the stormy weather this visit to Glens Falls will remain in my mind as a warm and rewarding interlude.

Thursday noon I went to Washington to speak for the Council on Social Work Education in the evening, and on Friday I spoke at Howard University in the afternoon and in the evening at the Roosevelt Day Dinner given by the Americans for Democratic Action. There are always more people to be seen and more things to do when I come to Washington than can possibly be done in the time I have free, but I enjoyed very much seeing some old friends and my granddaughter and her husband who is stationed at Fort Meade. I also had a glimpse of my son, Franklin Jr., and his family.

Saturday morning I go to Hyde Park for the usual ceremonies at my husband's grave at 11:30 a.m. The March of Dimes Poster Child always comes up to lay a wreath on my husband's grave and the President also sends a wreath which is laid by the Commandant from West Point, Major General Irving. The group usually comes to my cottage afterwards.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL